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Compensating wage differentials for defined benefit and defined contribution occupational pension scheme benefits

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  • Inkmann, Joachim

Abstract

The theory of equalizing differences suggests that employer provided pension benefits should be compensated by reduced wage benefits for an employee’s given produc-tivity potential. This paper presents an empirical analysis of compensating wage differentials for occupational pension scheme benefits in the UK using the newly available English Longi-tudinal Study of Ageing. The data allows us to differentiate between Defined Benefit (DB) and Defined Contribution (DC) schemes and to consider different measures of pension bene-fits based on current contributions and changes in accrued pension benefit rights. In our pre-ferred specifications we find evidence for perfect compensating wage differentials for both occupational DB and DC pension scheme benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Inkmann, Joachim, 2006. "Compensating wage differentials for defined benefit and defined contribution occupational pension scheme benefits," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24516, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:24516
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/24516/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Haynes, Jonathan B. & Sessions, John G., 2013. "Work now, pay later? An empirical analysis of the pension–pay trade off," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 835-843.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Compensating wage differentials; Occupational pension schemes; DB; DC; Pension benefits; Contributions; ABO; PBO;

    JEL classification:

    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

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