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Compensating wage differentials for defined benefit and defined contribution occupational pension scheme benefits

  • Joachim Inkmann

The theory of equalizing differences suggests that employer provided pension benefits should be compensated by reduced wage benefits for an employee’s given produc-tivity potential. This paper presents an empirical analysis of compensating wage differentials for occupational pension scheme benefits in the UK using the newly available English Longi-tudinal Study of Ageing. The data allows us to differentiate between Defined Benefit (DB) and Defined Contribution (DC) schemes and to consider different measures of pension bene-fits based on current contributions and changes in accrued pension benefit rights. In our pre-ferred specifications we find evidence for perfect compensating wage differentials for both occupational DB and DC pension scheme benefits.

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/24516/
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Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library in its series LSE Research Online Documents on Economics with number 24516.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: May 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:24516
Contact details of provider: Postal: LSE Library Portugal Street London, WC2A 2HD, U.K.
Phone: +44 (020) 7405 7686
Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/

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  1. James M. Poterba & Steven F. Venti & David A. Wise, 2001. "The Transition to Personal Accounts and Increasing Retirement Wealth: Macro and Micro Evidence," NBER Working Papers 8610, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Johnson, Richard W, 1996. "The Impact of Human Capital Investments on Pension Benefits," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 520-54, July.
  3. Edward B. Montgomery & Kathryn Shaw & Mary Ellen Benedict, 1990. "Pensions and Wages: An Hedonic Price Theory Approach," NBER Working Papers 3458, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Horowitz, J.L. & Manski, C.F., 1995. "Censoring of Outcomes and Regressors Due to Survey Nonresponse: Identification and estimation Using Weights and Imputations," Working Papers 95-12, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
  5. Blake, David, 2001. "The United Kingdom Pension System: Key Issues," Discussion Paper 15, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  6. Akerlof, George A & Katz, Lawrence F, 1989. "Workers' Trust Funds and the Logic of Wage Profiles," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(3), pages 525-36, August.
  7. Schiller, Bradley R & Weiss, Randall D, 1980. "Pensions and Wages: A Test for Equalizing Differences," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(4), pages 529-38, November.
  8. Andrew A. Samwick & Jonathan Skinner, 2004. "How Will 401(k) Pension Plans Affect Retirement Income?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 329-343, March.
  9. Joachim Inkmann & David Blake, 2004. "Liability valuation and optimal asset allocation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24754, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  10. Joseph G. Altonji & Emiko Usui, 2005. "Work Hours, Wages, and Vacation Leave," NBER Working Papers 11693, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. James Banks & Richard Blundell, 2005. "Private pension arrangements and retirement in Britain," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 26(1), pages 35-53, March.
  12. Morley Gunderson & James Pesando & Douglas Hyatt, 1992. "Wage-pension trade-offs in collective agreements," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 146-160, October.
  13. Woodbury, Stephen A, 1983. "Substitution between Wage and Nonwage Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 166-82, March.
  14. Hemming, Richard & Harvey, Russell, 1983. "Occupational Pension Scheme Membership and Retirement Saving," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 93(369), pages 128-44, March.
  15. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1980. "Retirement system characteristics and compensating wage differentials in the public sector," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 33(4), pages 470-483, July.
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