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Censoring of Outcomes and Regressors Due To Survey Nonresponse: Identification and Estimation Using Weights and Imputations

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Listed:
  • Joel L. Horowitz

    (U. of Iowa)

  • Charles F. Manski

Abstract

Survey nonresponse makes identification of population statistics problematic. Except in special cases, identification is possible only if one makes untestable assumptions about the distribution of the missing data. However, non-response does not preclude identification of bounds on population statistics. This paper shows how identified bounds on unidentified population statistics can be obtained under several forms of nonresponse. Organizations conducting major surveys commonly release public-use data files that provide nonresponse weights or imputations to be used for estimating population statistics. The paper shows how to bound the asymptotic bias of estimates using weights and imputations. The results are illustrated with empirical examples based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.

Suggested Citation

  • Joel L. Horowitz & Charles F. Manski, 1996. "Censoring of Outcomes and Regressors Due To Survey Nonresponse: Identification and Estimation Using Weights and Imputations," Econometrics 9602007, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Mar 1996.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:9602007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Manski, Charles F., 1992. "Identification Problems In The Social Sciences," SSRI Workshop Series 292716, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Social Systems Research Institute.
    2. Sims,Christopher A. (ed.), 1994. "Advances in Econometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521444606.
    3. Manski, C.F., 1990. "The Selection Problem," Working papers 90-12, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    4. Horowitz, Joel L & Manski, Charles F, 1995. "Identification and Robustness with Contaminated and Corrupted Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(2), pages 281-302, March.
    5. Sims,Christopher A. (ed.), 1994. "Advances in Econometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521444590.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • C4 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling
    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

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