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Private pension arrangements and retirement in Britain


  • James Banks

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London)

  • Richard Blundell

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London)


This paper looks at the policy debate surrounding private pensions and retirement patterns in the UK. Recent increases in longevity have led not only to increased pressures in public pensions but also to corresponding increases in the importance of private pensions in the UK and changes in the way in which they are structured. We consider the economic implications of these changes, and in particular the increased importance of defined contribution plans. In addition, we discuss the prospects for future trends in retirement ages.

Suggested Citation

  • James Banks & Richard Blundell, 2005. "Private pension arrangements and retirement in Britain," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 26(1), pages 35-53, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:26:y:2005:i:1:p:35-53

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rabin, Matthew, 2002. "A perspective on psychology and economics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(4-5), pages 657-685, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Justin van de Ven & Martin Weale, 2007. "Annuities and Aggregate Mortality Uncertainty," WEF Working Papers 0027, ESRC World Economy and Finance Research Programme, Birkbeck, University of London.
    2. Paul J. Devereux & Robert A. Hart, 2010. "Forced to be Rich? Returns to Compulsory Schooling in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(549), pages 1345-1364, December.
    3. Jiří Večerník, 2006. "Changing Social Status of Pensioners and the Prospects of Pension Reform in the Czech Republic," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2006(3), pages 195-213.
    4. Joachim Inkmann & Paula Lopes & Alexander Michaelides, 2011. "How Deep Is the Annuity Market Participation Puzzle?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(1), pages 279-319.
    5. Michał Myck, 2010. "Wages and Ageing: Is There Evidence for the 'Inverse-U' Profile?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(3), pages 282-306, June.
    6. Inkmann, Joachim, 2006. "Compensating wage differentials for defined benefit and defined contribution occupational pension scheme benefits," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24516, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Owen O'Donnell & Federica Teppa & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2008. "Can subjective survival expectations explain retirement behaviour?," DNB Working Papers 188, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions


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