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Job mobility and the gender wage gap

  • Emilia Del Bono
  • Daniela Vuri

    ()

    (Dipartimento di Economia, Sapienza University of Rome Italy)

This paper investigates the way in which job mobility contributes to the emergence of a gender wage gap in the Italian labour market. We show that men experience higher wage growth than women during the first 10 years of their career, and that this difference is particularly large when workers move across firms. This gender mobility penalty is robust to the inclusion of individual, job and firm characteristics, to different ways of accounting for individual unobserved heterogeneity, and is mainly found for voluntary job moves. Exploring the wage growth of job movers, we find that a significant gender wage penalty emerges when workers move to larger firms. This might be explained by the fact that bigger establishments offer jobs more highly valued by women than men or that the relationship between job satisfaction and firm size is less negative for women than men. Using data on job satisfaction, we find evidence for the latter hypothesis as well as some indication that wages and fringe benefits compensate for lower levels of job satisfaction in larger firms, but that this is so only for men.

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File URL: http://dipartimento.dse.uniroma1.it/DSEISFOL/papers/DelBono_Vuri_7_2008_WP.pdf
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Paper provided by Dipartimento di Economia, Sapienza University of Rome in its series Working Papers - Dipartimento di Economia with number 7-DEISFOL.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision: 2008
Handle: RePEc:des:wpaper:13
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://dipartimento.dse.uniroma1.it/economia/

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  11. Kristen Keith & Abagail McWilliams, 1999. "The Returns to mobility and job search by gender," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(3), pages 460-477, April.
  12. Dolton, P J & Makepeace, G H, 1986. "Sample Selection and Male-Female Earnings Differentials in the Graduate Labour Market," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 317-41, July.
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  15. Johannes Geyer & Viktor Steiner, 2007. "Short-Run and Long-Term Effects of Childbirth on Mothers' Employment and Working Hours across Institutional Regimes: An Empirical Analysis Based on the European Community Household Panel," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 682, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  16. Donata Favaro & Stefano Magrini, 2005. "Group versus individual discrimination among young workers: a distributional approach," Labor and Demography 0506003, EconWPA.
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  18. Light, Audrey & Ureta, Manuelita, 1995. "Early-Career Work Experience and Gender Wage Differentials," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 121-54, January.
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