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Job Mobility and Gender-Based Wage Growth Differentials

Author

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  • Keith, Kristen
  • McWilliams, Abagail

Abstract

Studies of gender differences in the returns to job mobility have yielded conflicting results. The authors examine whether there are gender differences in mobility patterns or in the returns to different types of mobility. Their results, based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, imply that there are gender differences in mobility patterns but there are not gender differences in the wage growth associated with different types of mobility. Therefore, it appears that empirical estimates of the gender differences in the returns to job mobility may be misleading if they do not consider the cause of separation. Copyright 1997 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith, Kristen & McWilliams, Abagail, 1997. "Job Mobility and Gender-Based Wage Growth Differentials," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 320-333, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:35:y:1997:i:2:p:320-33
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adele Bergin, 2015. "Employer Changes and Wage Changes: Estimation with Measurement Error in a Binary Variable," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(2), pages 194-223, June.
    2. Johannes Wieschke, 2018. "Frequency of employer changes and their financial return: gender differences amongst German university graduates," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 52(1), pages 1-13, December.
    3. Sami Napari, 2008. "The Early‐career Gender Wage Gap among University Graduates in the Finnish Private Sector," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(4), pages 697-733, December.
    4. Reichelt, Malte & Abraham, Martin, 2015. "Occupational and regional mobility as substitutes : a new approach to understanding job changes and wage inequality," IAB Discussion Paper 201514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Maite Blazquez, 2006. "The Probability of Leaving a Low-Paid Job in Spain: The Importance of Switching into Permanent Employment," Revista de Economía Laboral - Spanish Journal of Labour Economics, Asociación Española de Economía Laboral - AEET, vol. 3, pages 58-86.
    6. Del Bono, Emilia & Vuri, Daniela, 2011. "Job mobility and the gender wage gap in Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 130-142, January.
    7. Alan Manning & Joanna Swaffield, 2008. "The gender gap in early-career wage growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 983-1024, July.
    8. Battu, H. & Seaman, P.T & Sloane, P.J., "undated". "Are Married Women Spatially Constrained? A test of gender differentials in labour market outcomes," Working Papers 98-07, Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen.
    9. Sigal Alon & Marta Tienda, 2000. "Employment and Wage Consequences of Young Women's Labor Force and Job Transitions," Working Papers 318, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Office of Population Research..
    10. Marcela Perticara, "undated". "Wage Mobility Through Job Mobility," ILADES-UAH Working Papers inv141, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Business.
    11. Napari, Sami, 2009. "Gender differences in early-career wage growth," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 140-148, April.
    12. Caparrós Ruiz, Antonio & Navarro Gomez, Mª Lucia & Rueda Narváez, Mario F., 2010. "Rentabilidad salarial de la formación laboral: un análisis con datos de panel /Wage Returns to Training Investments: A Panel Data Analysis," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 28, pages 483(20á.)-4, Agosto.
    13. Delfgaauw, Josse, 2007. "The effect of job satisfaction on job search: Not just whether, but also where," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 299-317, June.
    14. Değer Eryar & Hasan Tekgüç, 2014. "Gender Effect in Explaining Mobility Patterns in the Labor Market: A Case Study of Turkey," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(4), pages 322-350, December.
    15. Theodossiou, I. & Zangelidis, A., 2009. "Should I stay or should I go? The effect of gender, education and unemployment on labour market transitions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 566-577, October.
    16. Napari, Sami, . "Essays on the Gender Wage Gap in Finland," ETLA A, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, number 44.
    17. Emilia Del Bono & Daniela Vuri, 2008. "Job mobility and the gender wage gap," Working Papers - Dipartimento di Economia 7-DEISFOL, Dipartimento di Economia, Sapienza University of Rome, revised 2008.
    18. Maite Blázquez, 2009. "Earnings mobility in Spain: the role of job mobility and contractual arrangements," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 179-205, September.
    19. David Campbell, 2001. "Estimating the Wage Effects of Job Mobility in Britain," Studies in Economics 0117, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    20. Fujii, Mayu & Shiraishi, Kousuke & Takayama, Noriyuki, 2018. "The effects of early job separation on later life outcomes," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 68-84.
    21. Sami Napari, 2006. "The Early Career Gender Wage Gap," CEP Discussion Papers dp0738, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

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