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Capital Inflows and Booms in Assets Prices: Evidence From a Panel of Countries

  • Eduardo Olaberría

Policymakers and academics often associate large capital inflows with booms in asset prices. To date, however, methodical evidence of this association is still limited. This paper provides a systematic empirical analysis of the link between capital inflows and booms in asset prices. Using a panel of 40 countries from 1990 to 2010 and controlling for other macroeconomic factors, the paper finds that the link varies across capital inflow categories and across countries. In particular, emerging countries are more likely to experience booms in asset prices during periods of large capital inflows. In line with leading theories of financial crises the paper finds that financial development, the quality of institutions and the exchange rate regime can potentially influence the association between capital inflows and booms in asset prices. In contrast, this paper does not find evidence to support the view that capital controls help reduce this association.

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Paper provided by Central Bank of Chile in its series Working Papers Central Bank of Chile with number 675.

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Date of creation: Aug 2012
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Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:675
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  1. Kenneth A. Froot & Tarun Ramadorai, 2008. "Institutional Portfolio Flows and International Investments," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(2), pages 937-971, April.
  2. Nicolas E. Magud & Esteban Vesperoni & Carmen Reinhart, 2012. "Capital Inflows, Exchange Rate Flexibility, and Credit Booms," IMF Working Papers 12/41, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Cardarelli, Roberto & Elekdag, Selim & Kose, M. Ayhan, 2010. "Capital inflows: Macroeconomic implications and policy responses," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 333-356, December.
  4. Kosuke Aoki & Gianluca Benigno & Nobuhiro Kiyotak, 2007. "Capital flows and asset prices," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3168, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    • Kosuke Aoki & Gianluca Benigno & Nobuhiro Kiyotaki, 2009. "Capital Flows and Asset Prices," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2007, pages 175-216 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2002. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," NBER Working Papers 8963, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Soyoung Kim & Doo Yang, 2011. "The Impact of Capital Inflows on Asset Prices in Emerging Asian Economies: Is Too Much Money Chasing Too Little Good?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 293-315, April.
  7. Reinhart, Carmen & Kaminsky, Graciela, 1999. "The twin crises: The causes of banking and balance of payments problems," MPRA Paper 14081, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Hui Tong & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "The Composition Matters: Capital Inflows and Liquidity Crunch during a Global Economic Crisis," NBER Working Papers 15207, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Carmen M. Reinhart & Vincent R. Reinhart, 2008. "Capital Flow Bonanzas: An Encompassing View of the Past and Present," NBER Working Papers 14321, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Kim, Soyoung & Yang, Doo Yong, 2008. "The Impact of Capital Inflows on Emerging East Asian Economies: Is Too Much Money Chasing Too Little Good?," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 15, Asian Development Bank.
  11. Javier Bianchi, 2010. "Credit Externalities: Macroeconomic Effects and Policy Implications," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 398-402, May.
  12. Jinjarak, Yothin & Sheffrin, Steven M., 2011. "Causality, real estate prices, and the current account," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 233-246, June.
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