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Do Victories and Losses Matter? Effects of Football on Life Satisfaction

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  • Radek Janhuba

Abstract

Every week during the autumn season, millions of Americans attend football games and even more watch the sport on TV. In addition to generating entertainment revenues, previous research has also shown that sports events lead to changes in emotions in minds of fans. This study examines whether sports infl uence the subjective well-being of the population. Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an ordered logit model estimates effects of a local college football team's results on the life satisfaction of local citizens. The analysis suggests that unexpected wins have positive effects on life satisfaction. Surprisingly, no effect is found for cases of unexpected losses or outcomes which can not be labeled as surprising based on the pre-game betting market.

Suggested Citation

  • Radek Janhuba, 2016. "Do Victories and Losses Matter? Effects of Football on Life Satisfaction," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp579, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
  • Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp579
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    life satisfaction; sports; football;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • Z29 - Other Special Topics - - Sports Economics - - - Other
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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