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Is soccer good for you? The motivational impact of big sporting events on the unemployed

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  • Doerrenberg, Philipp
  • Siegloch, Sebastian

Abstract

We examine the effect of salient international soccer tournaments on the motivation of unemployed individuals to search for employment using the German Socio Economic Panel 1984–2010. Exploiting the random scheduling of survey interviews, we find significant effects on motivational variables such as the intention to work or the reservation wage. Furthermore, the sporting events increase perceived health as well as worries about the general economic situation.

Suggested Citation

  • Doerrenberg, Philipp & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2014. "Is soccer good for you? The motivational impact of big sporting events on the unemployed," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 66-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:123:y:2014:i:1:p:66-69
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2014.01.011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Gordon B. Dahl, 2011. "Family Violence and Football: The Effect of Unexpected Emotional Cues on Violent Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 103-143.
    2. Daniel I. Rees & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2009. "College Football Games and Crime," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 10(1), pages 68-87, February.
    3. Dohmen, Thomas J & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David & Sunde, Uwe, 2006. "Seemingly Irrelevant Events Affect Perceptions and Expectations - The FIFA World Cup 2006 as a Natural Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 5851, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Peter Skogman Thoursie, 2004. "Reporting sick: are sporting events contagious?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 809-823.
    5. Fernando A Lozano, 2011. "The Flexibility Of The Workweek In The United States: Evidence From The Fifa World Cup," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(2), pages 512-529, April.
    6. Kavetsos, Georgios & Szymanski, Stefan, 2010. "National well-being and international sports events," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 158-171, April.
    7. Alex Edmans & Diego García & Øyvind Norli, 2007. "Sports Sentiment and Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(4), pages 1967-1998, August.
    8. Bert Scholtens & Wijtze Peenstra, 2009. "Scoring on the stock exchange? The effect of football matches on stock market returns: an event study," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(25), pages 3231-3237.
    9. Jason M. Lindo & Isaac D. Swensen & Glen R. Waddell, 2012. "Are Big-Time Sports a Threat to Student Achievement?," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 254-274, October.
    10. Ehrmann, Michael & Jansen, David-Jan, 2012. "The pitch rather than the pit: investor inattention during FIFA world cup matches," Working Paper Series 1424, European Central Bank.
    11. Kaplanski, Guy & Levy, Haim, 2010. "Exploitable Predictable Irrationality: The FIFA World Cup Effect on the U.S. Stock Market," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(02), pages 535-553, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Radek Janhuba, 2016. "Do Victories and Losses Matter? Effects of Football on Life Satisfaction," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp579, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    2. repec:ove:journl:aid:11247 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:zbw:rwirep:0501 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Diermeier, Matthias & Goecke, Henry & Niehues, Judith & Thomas, Tobias, 2017. "Impact of inequality-related media coverage on the concerns of the citzens," DICE Discussion Papers 258, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    5. Lucia Rizzica & Marco Tonello, 2015. "Exposure to media and corruption perceptions," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1043, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sporting events; Soccer; Unemployment; Well-being;

    JEL classification:

    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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