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The Effect of Gender Equality on International Soccer Performance

Author

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  • Bredtmann, Julia
  • Crede, Carsten J.
  • Otten, Sebastian

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a new estimation strategy that uses the variation in success between the male and the female national soccer team within a country to identify the causal impact of gender equality on women's soccer performance. In particular, we analyze whether within-country variations in labor force participation rates and life expectancies between the genders, which serve as measures for the country's gender equality, are able to explain differences in the international success of male and female national soccer teams. Our results reveal that differences in male and female labor force participation rates and life expectancies are able to explain the international soccer performance of female teams, but not that of male teams, suggesting that gender equality is an important driver of female sport success.

Suggested Citation

  • Bredtmann, Julia & Crede, Carsten J. & Otten, Sebastian, 2014. "The Effect of Gender Equality on International Soccer Performance," Ruhr Economic Papers 501, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:501
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Esther Duflo, 2012. "Women Empowerment and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1051-1079, December.
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    5. Dohmen, Thomas & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David B. & Sunde, Uwe, 2006. "Seemingly Irrelevant Events Affect Economic Perceptions and Expectations: The FIFA World Cup 2006 as a Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 2275, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    7. Kaplanski, Guy & Levy, Haim, 2010. "Exploitable Predictable Irrationality: The FIFA World Cup Effect on the U.S. Stock Market," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(2), pages 535-553, April.
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    12. Aaron Lowen & Robert O. Deaner & Erika Schmitt, 2016. "Guys and Gals Going for Gold," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 17(3), pages 260-285, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Meshael Batarfi & J. James Reade, 2020. "Why are we so good at football, and they so bad? Institutions and national footballing performance," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-17, Department of Economics, Reading University.
    2. Melanie Krause & Stefan Szymanski, 2017. "Convergence vs. the middle income trap: The case of global soccer," Working Papers 453, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international sport success; soccer; gender equality; fixed-effects estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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