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The pitch rather than the pit: investor inattention during FIFA World Cup matches

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  • Michael Ehrmann
  • David-Jan Jansen

Abstract

At the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, many soccer matches were played during stock market trading hours, providing us with a natural experiment to analyze fluctuations in investor attention. Using minute-by-minute trading data for fifteen international stock exchanges, we present three key findings. First, when the national team was playing, the number of trades dropped by 45%, while volumes were 55% lower. Second, market activity was influenced by match events. For instance, a goal caused an additional drop in trading activity by 5%. The magnitude of this reduction resembles what is observed during lunchtime, and as such might not be indicative for shifts in attention. However, our third finding is that the comovement between national and global stock market returns decreased by over 20% during World Cup matches, whereas no comparable decoupling can be found during lunchtime. We conclude that stock markets were following developments on the soccer pitch rather than in the trading pit, leading to a changed price formation process.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Ehrmann & David-Jan Jansen, 2012. "The pitch rather than the pit: investor inattention during FIFA World Cup matches," DNB Working Papers 337, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:337
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Ehrmann & David-Jan Jansen, 2016. "It Hurts (Stock Prices) When Your Team is about to Lose a Soccer Match," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 20(3), pages 1215-1233.
    2. Fung, Ka Wai Terence & Demir, Ender & Lau, Marco Chi Keung & Chan, Kwok Ho, 2013. "An Examination of Sports Event Sentiment: Microeconomic Evidence from Borsa Istanbul," MPRA Paper 52874, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:ove:journl:aid:11247 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Doerrenberg, Philipp & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2014. "Is soccer good for you? The motivational impact of big sporting events on the unemployed," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 66-69.
    5. Carlos Viana de Carvalho & Eduardo Zilberman & Ruy Ribeiro, "undated". "Sentiment, Electoral Uncertainty and Stock Returns," Textos para discussão 655, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    6. Fung, Ka Wai Terence & Demir, Ender & Lau, Chi Keung Marco & Chan, Kwok Ho, 2015. "Reexamining sports-sentiment hypothesis: Microeconomic evidences from Borsa Istanbul," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 337-355.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    investor inattention; stock markets; trading volume; high-frequency data; soccer;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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