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Production Networks: A Primer

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Listed:
  • Carvalho, V. M
  • Tahbaz-Salehi, A.

Abstract

This article reviews the literature on production networks in macroeconomics. It presents the theoretical foundations for the roles of input-output linkages as a shock propagation channel and a mechanism for transforming microeconomic shocks into macroeconomic fluctuations. The article provides a brief guide to the growing literature that explores these themes empirically and quantitatively.

Suggested Citation

  • Carvalho, V. M & Tahbaz-Salehi, A., 2018. "Production Networks: A Primer," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1856, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:1856
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Vasco Carvalho, 2007. "Aggregate fluctuations and the network structure of intersectoral trade," Economics Working Papers 1206, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 2010.
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    Keywords

    networks; shock propagation; input-output linkages.;

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