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The Micro Origins of International Business Cycle Comovement

Listed author(s):
  • Julian Di Giovanni

    ()

    (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona GSE, CREI, CEPR)

  • Andrei A. Levchenko
  • Isabelle Méjean

This paper investigates the role of individual firms in international business cycle comovement using data covering the universe of French firm-level value added, bilateral imports and exports, and cross-border ownership over the period 1993-2007. At the micro level, controlling for firm and country effects, trade in goods with a particular foreign country is associated with a significantly higher correlation between a firm and that foreign country. In addition, foreign multinational a liates operating in France are significantly more correlated with the source economy. The impact of direct trade and multinational linkages on comovement at the micro level has significant macro implications. Because internationally connected firms are systematically larger than noninternationally connected firms, the firms directly linked to foreign countries represent only 8% of all firms, but 56% of all value added, and account for 75% of the observed aggregate comovement. Without those linkages the correlation between France and foreign countries would fall by about 0.091, or one-third of the observed average business cycle correlation of 0.29 in our sample of partner countries. These results are evidence of transmission of business cycle shocks through direct trade and multinational ownership linkages at the firm level.

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Paper provided by Center for Research in Economics and Statistics in its series Working Papers with number 2016-16.

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Length: 86
Date of creation: Dec 2015
Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2016-16
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  1. Vasco Carvalho, 2007. "Aggregate fluctuations and the network structure of intersectoral trade," Economics Working Papers 1206, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 2010.
  2. Javier Cravino & Andrei A. Levchenko, 2017. "Multinational Firms and International Business Cycle Transmission," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(2), pages 921-962.
  3. repec:aea:aejmac:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:254-80 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Nitya Pandalai Nayar & Aaron Flaaen & Christoph Boehm, 2015. "Input Linkages and the Transmission of Shocks: Firm-Level Evidence from the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake," 2015 Meeting Papers 383, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. repec:bof:bofrdp:urn:nbn:fi:bof-201512101464 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. George Alessandria & Horag Choi, 2007. "Do Sunk Costs of Exporting Matter for Net Export Dynamics?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 289-336.
  7. Burstein, Ariel & Kurz, Christopher & Tesar, Linda, 2008. "Trade, production sharing, and the international transmission of business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 775-795, May.
  8. Calderon, Cesar & Chong, Alberto & Stein, Ernesto, 2007. "Trade intensity and business cycle synchronization: Are developing countries any different?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 2-21, March.
  9. Daron Acemoglu & Ufuk Akcigit & William Kerr, 2016. "Networks and the Macroeconomy: An Empirical Exploration," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 273-335.
  10. Blonigen, Bruce A. & Piger, Jeremy & Sly, Nicholas, 2014. "Comovement in GDP trends and cycles among trading partners," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 239-247.
  11. David Baqaee, 2016. "Cascading Failures in Production Networks," 2016 Meeting Papers 402, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  12. Vasco Carvalho & Basile Grassi, 2015. "Large firm dynamics and the business cycle," Economics Working Papers 1481, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  13. Wei Liao & Ana Maria Santacreu, 2012. "The Trade Comovement Puzzle and the Margins of International Trade," Working Papers 042012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  14. Ng, Eric C.Y., 2010. "Production fragmentation and business-cycle comovement," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-14, September.
  15. Enghin Atalay, 2017. "How Important Are Sectoral Shocks?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 254-280, October.
  16. Friberg, Richard & Sanctuary, Mark, 2016. "The contribution of firm-level shocks to aggregate fluctuations: The case of Sweden," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 8-11.
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