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Direct and Intermediated Marketing of Local Foods in the United States

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  • Low, Sarah A.
  • Vogel, Stephen J.

Abstract

This study uses nationally representative data on the marketing of local foods to assess the relative scale of local food marketing channels. This research documents that sales through intermediated marketing channels, such as farmers’ sales to local grocers and restaurants, account for a large portion of all local food sales. Small and medium-sized farms dominate local foods sales marketed exclusively through direct-to-consumer channels (foods sold at roadside stands or farmers’ markets, for example) while large farms dominate local food sales marketed exclusively through intermediated channels. Farmers marketing food locally are most prominent in the Northeast and the West Coast regions and areas close to densely populated urban markets. Climate and topography favoring the production of fruits and vegetables, proximity to and neighboring farm participation in farmers’ markets, and good transportation and information access are found to be associated with higher levels of direct-to-consumer sales.

Suggested Citation

  • Low, Sarah A. & Vogel, Stephen J., 2011. "Direct and Intermediated Marketing of Local Foods in the United States," Economic Research Report 118025, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:118025
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/118025
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cheryl Brown & Stacy Miller, 2008. "The Impacts of Local Markets: A Review of Research on Farmers Markets and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1298-1302.
    2. Dawn Thilmany & Craig A. Bond & Jennifer K. Bond, 2008. "Going Local: Exploring Consumer Behavior and Motivations for Direct Food Purchases," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1303-1309.
    3. Thilmany, Dawn D. & Watson, Philip, 2004. "The Increasing Role Of Direct Marketing And Farmers Markets For Western Us Producers," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 3(02), December.
    4. Brown, Cheryl & Gandee, Jesse E. & D'Souza, Gerard E., 2006. "West Virginia Farm Direct Marketing: A County Level Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(03), December.
    5. Brown, Cheryl & Gandee, Jesse E. & D'Souza, Gerard, 2006. "West Virginia Farm Direct Marketing: A County Level Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(03), pages 575-584, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Local foods; direct marketing channels; direct sales; intermediated sales Acknowledgments: The; Agricultural and Food Policy; Marketing;

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