IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/ijofsd/199405.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Urban Gardening Realities: The Example Case Study of Portsmouth, England

Author

Listed:
  • Hallsworth, Alan
  • Wong, Alfred

Abstract

This paper offers an empirical case study of the potential for urban gardening to contribute to individual food security. Food security generally encompasses both availability and accessibility. In Western Europe, availability per se has declined in importance with the development of national and international transportation networks. During the past decade, urban gardening has gained political currency as a strategy to provide greater food security at the local level. However, prevailing economic and social structures hamper the likelihood that urban gardening might offer much greater food security. Realistically, contemporary urban gardening most closely resembles a middle-class pursuit for personal enjoyment.

Suggested Citation

  • Hallsworth, Alan & Wong, Alfred, 2015. "Urban Gardening Realities: The Example Case Study of Portsmouth, England," International Journal on Food System Dynamics, International Center for Management, Communication, and Research, vol. 6(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ijofsd:199405
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/199405
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cembalo, Luigi & Migliore, Giuseppina & Schifani, Giorgio, 2011. "Political Consumerism and Food Community Networks," 2011 International European Forum, February 14-18, 2011, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 122004, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    2. Hand, Michael S. & Martinez, Stephen W., 2010. "Just What Does Local Mean?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1).
    3. Lev, Larry & Gwin, Lauren, 2010. "Filling in the Gaps: Eight Things to Recognize about Farm-Direct Marketing," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1).
    4. Onken, Kathryn A. & Bernard, John C., 2010. "Catching the "Local" Bug: A Look at State Agricultural Marketing Programs," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1).
    5. Hardesty, Shermain D., 2010. "Do Government Policies Grow Local Food?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1).
    6. Grunert, Klaus G., 2011. "Sustainability in the Food Sector: A Consumer Behaviour Perspective," International Journal on Food System Dynamics, International Center for Management, Communication, and Research, vol. 2(3).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wellner, Marie & Theuvsen, Ludwig, 2016. "Community Supported Agriculture Als Neuer Impuls Für Die Regionalvermarktung? Stand Der Forschung Und Abgrenzung Von Anderen Alternativen Lebensmittelnetzwerken," 56th Annual Conference, Bonn, Germany, September 28-30, 2016 244757, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:ijofsd:199405. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/centmde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.