IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pmo631.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Jon Roger Moen

Personal Details

First Name:Jon
Middle Name:Roger
Last Name:Moen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo631
http://web.me.com/jonmoen1

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Mississippi

University, Mississippi (United States)
http://www.econ.olemiss.edu/

: (662) 915 - 6942
(662) 915 - 6943
371 Holman Hall, University MS 38677
RePEc:edi:deumsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2014. "Outside Lending in the NYC Call Loan Market," Working Papers (Old Series) 1408, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 27 Aug 2014.
  2. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2014. "The Transmission of the Financial Crisis in 1907: An Empirical Investigation," Working Papers (Old Series) 1409, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 03 Sep 2014.
  3. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Close but not a central bank: The New York Clearing House and issues of clearing house loan certificates," Working Papers (Old Series) 1308, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.
  4. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2010. "Liquidity creation without a lender of last resort: clearing house loan certificates in the Banking Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1010, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
  5. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2003. "New York and the politics of central banks, 1781 to the Federal Reserve Act," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-42, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  6. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2003. "The call loan market in the U.S. financial system prior to the Federal Reserve System," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-43, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  7. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1999. "Why didn't the United States establish a central bank until after the panic of 1907?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 99-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  8. Moen, J., 1998. "Trade and Development: Is South-South Co-operation a Feasible Strategy?," Papers 21/98, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.
  9. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1995. "Clearinghouse access and bank runs: comparing New York and Chicago during the Panic of 1907," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 95-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  10. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1994. "Clearinghouse access and bank runs: trust companies in New York and Chicago during the Panic of 1907," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 94-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1993. "Liquidity shocks and financial crises during the national banking era," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 93-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  12. Jon R. Moen, 1988. "The shifting structure of occupations and the effect on labor force participation rates of American males 1860-1980," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 88-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

Articles

  1. Ellis W. Tallman & Jon R. Moen, 2018. "The transmission of the financial crisis in 1907: an empirical investigation," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 277-312, May.
  2. Jon Moen & Ellis Tallman, 2016. "Quels enseignements de la panique de 1907 pour l’analyse de la crise de 2008 ?," Revue d'économie financière, Association d'économie financière, vol. 0(3), pages 317-324.
  3. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.
  4. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2008. "Errata to "Gold shocks, liquidity, and the United States Economy during the National Banking Era" [Explor. Econ. Hist. 35 (1998) 381-404]," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 100-105, January.
  5. Moen, Jon R. & Tallman, Ellis W., 2000. "Clearinghouse Membership and Deposit Contraction during the Panic of 1907," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 145-163, March.
  6. Moen, Jon, 1999. "The Evolution of Retirement: An American Economic History, 1880–1990. ByDora L. Costa · Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998. xiii + 234 pp. Figures, tables, notes, appendix, references, name," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 139-142, April.
  7. Tallman, Ellis & Moen, Jon, 1998. "Gold Shocks, Liquidity, and the United States Economy during the National Banking Era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 381-404, October.
  8. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1995. "Private sector responses to the Panic of 1907: a comparison of New York and Chicago," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, vol. 80(Mar), pages 1-9.
  9. Moen, Jon & Tallman, Ellis W., 1992. "The Bank Panic of 1907: The Role of Trust Companies," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(3), pages 611-630, September.
  10. Jon R. Moen, 1990. "Fewer older men in the U.S. work force: technological, behavioral, and legislative contributions to the decline," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Nov, pages 16-31.
  11. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1990. "Lessons from the panic of 1907," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue May, pages 2-13.
  12. Jon R. Moen, 1989. "Poverty in the South," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jan, pages 36-46.
  13. Jon R. Moen, 1988. "Past and current trends in retirement: American men from 1860 to 1980," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jul, pages 16-27.
  14. Jon R. Moen, 1988. "Diversity and balanced growth: Tennessee stays on track," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jan, pages 58-66.
  15. Jon R. Moen, 1986. "Tennessee: challenges ahead," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Nov, pages 37-46.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2014. "The Transmission of the Financial Crisis in 1907: An Empirical Investigation," Working Papers (Old Series) 1409, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 03 Sep 2014.

    Cited by:

    1. Rockoff, Hugh, 2015. "O.M.W. Sprague (the man who “wrote the book” on financial crises) and the founding of the Federal Reserve," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 35-45.
    2. Matthew S. Jaremski & David C. Wheelock, 2019. "The Founding of the Federal Reserve, the Great Depression and the Evolution of the U.S. Interbank Network," NBER Working Papers 26034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Gary Gorton & Ellis W. Tallman, 2016. "How Did Pre-Fed Banking Panics End?," NBER Working Papers 22036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fohlin, Caroline & Gehrig, Thomas & Haas, Marlene, 2015. "Rumors and Runs in Opaque Markets: Evidence from the Panic of 1907," CEPR Discussion Papers 10497, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Liquidity and Borrowing from a Lender of Last Resort during the Crisis of 1884," Working Papers 1901, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2019.
    6. Gehrig, Thomas Paul & Fohlin, Caroline & Haas, Marlene, 2015. "Liquidty Freezes and Market Runs; Evidencefrom the Panic of 1907," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113008, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.

  2. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Close but not a central bank: The New York Clearing House and issues of clearing house loan certificates," Working Papers (Old Series) 1308, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.

    Cited by:

    1. Gary Gorton & Ellis W. Tallman, 2016. "How Did Pre-Fed Banking Panics End?," NBER Working Papers 22036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Christopher Hoag, 2015. "Clearinghouse Loan Certificates as a Lender of Last Resort," Working Papers 1503, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2015.
    3. Jaremski, Matthew, 2015. "Clearinghouses as credit regulators before the fed?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 10-21.
    4. Moen, Jon & Tallman, Ellis, 2018. "Outside Lending in the New York City Call Loan Market," MPRA Paper 88733, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Gary Gorton & Ellis W. Tallman, 2016. "Too Big to Fail before the Fed," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 528-532, May.
    6. Christopher Hoag, 2015. "Clearinghouse Loan Certificates as Interbank Loans," Working Papers 1504, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2015.

  3. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2010. "Liquidity creation without a lender of last resort: clearing house loan certificates in the Banking Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1010, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.

    Cited by:

    1. Acharya, Viral V & Gromb, Denis & Yorulmazer, Tanju, 2008. "Imperfect Competition in the Inter-Bank Market for Liquidity as a Rationale for Central Banking," CEPR Discussion Papers 6984, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Ellis W. Tallman & Elmus R. Wicker, 2010. "Banking and financial crises in United States history: what guidance can history offer policymakers?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1009, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
    3. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Close but not a central bank: The New York Clearing House and issues of clearing house loan certificates," Working Papers (Old Series) 1308, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.
    4. Mark A. Carlson, 2013. "Lessons from the historical use of reserve requirements in the United States to promote bank liquidity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Gary B. Gorton, 2012. "Some Reflections on the Recent Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 18397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.
    7. Norman, Ben & Shaw, Rachel & Speight, George, 2011. "The history of interbank settlement arrangements: exploring central banks’ role in the payment system," Bank of England working papers 412, Bank of England.

  4. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2003. "New York and the politics of central banks, 1781 to the Federal Reserve Act," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-42, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. David G. Mayes & Maria J. Nieto & Larry D. Wall, 2011. "Creating an EU-level supervisor for cross-border banking groups: Issues raised by the U.S. experience with dual banking," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2011-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  5. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2003. "The call loan market in the U.S. financial system prior to the Federal Reserve System," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-43, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Asaf Bernstein & Eric Hughson & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2014. "Counterparty Risk and the Establishment of the New York Stock Exchange Clearinghouse," NBER Working Papers 20459, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Christopher Hoag, 2015. "Clearinghouse Loan Certificates as Interbank Loans," Working Papers 1504, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2015.

  6. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1999. "Why didn't the United States establish a central bank until after the panic of 1907?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 99-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark A. Carlson, 2013. "Lessons from the historical use of reserve requirements in the United States to promote bank liquidity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.
    3. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.

  7. Moen, J., 1998. "Trade and Development: Is South-South Co-operation a Feasible Strategy?," Papers 21/98, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.

    Cited by:

    1. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2010. "The Role of China in Regional South-South Trade in Asia-Pacific: Prospects for industrialization of the low-income countries," MPRA Paper 26358, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2010. "The rationale for South-South trade; An Alternative Approach," MPRA Paper 26354, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2008. "South-South Regionalism And Trade Cooperation In The Asia-Pacific Region," MPRA Paper 10886, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  8. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1994. "Clearinghouse access and bank runs: trust companies in New York and Chicago during the Panic of 1907," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 94-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew S. Jaremski, 2017. "The (Dis)Advantages of Clearinghouses Before the Fed," NBER Working Papers 23113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rockoff, Hugh, 2015. "O.M.W. Sprague (the man who “wrote the book” on financial crises) and the founding of the Federal Reserve," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 35-45.
    3. Asaf Bernstein & Eric Hughson & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2008. "Can a Lender of Last Resort Stabilize Financial Markets? Lessons from the Founding of the Fed," NBER Working Papers 14422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Gary Gorton & Lixin Huang, 2002. "Bank Panics and the Endogeneity of Central Banking," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 02-29, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    5. Matthew S. Jaremski & David C. Wheelock, 2019. "The Founding of the Federal Reserve, the Great Depression and the Evolution of the U.S. Interbank Network," NBER Working Papers 26034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Reinhart, Carmen & Felton, Andrew, 2008. "The First Global Financial Crisis of the 21st Century," MPRA Paper 11862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Gary Gorton & Andrew Winton, 2002. "Financial Intermediation," NBER Working Papers 8928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Daniel R. Sanches, 2013. "Banking crises and the role of bank coalitions," Working Papers 13-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2013.
    9. Michael D. Bordo & Angela Redish & Hugh Rockoff, 2015. "Why didn't Canada have a banking crisis in 2008 (or in 1930, or 1907, or …)?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 218-243, February.
    10. Margaret M. Jacobson & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Liquidity provision during the crisis of 1914: private and public sources," Working Papers (Old Series) 1304, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.
    11. Ellis W. Tallman & Jon R. Moen, 2018. "The transmission of the financial crisis in 1907: an empirical investigation," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 277-312, May.
    12. Daniel R. Sanches, 2015. "On the welfare properties of fractional reserve banking," Working Papers 15-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 14 Apr 2015.
    13. Gary Gorton & Ellis W. Tallman, 2016. "How Did Pre-Fed Banking Panics End?," NBER Working Papers 22036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Bank Executive Experience in a Financial Crisis," Working Papers 1902, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
    15. Laurent Le Maux & Laurence Scialom, 2013. "Central banks and financial stability: rediscovering the lender-of-last-resort practice in a finance economy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(1), pages 1-16.
    16. Jaremski, Matthew, 2015. "Clearinghouses as credit regulators before the fed?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 10-21.
    17. Ellis W. Tallman & Elmus R. Wicker, 2010. "Banking and financial crises in United States history: what guidance can history offer policymakers?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1009, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
    18. Frederic S. Mishkin & Eugene N. White, 2014. "Unprecedented Actions: The Federal Reserve’s Response to the Global Financial Crisis in Historical Perspective," NBER Working Papers 20737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Hoag, Christopher, 2005. "Deposit drains on "interest-paying" banks before financial crises," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 567-585, October.
    20. Bernstein, Asaf & Hughson, Eric & Weidenmier, Marc D., 2010. "Identifying the effects of a lender of last resort on financial markets: Lessons from the founding of the fed," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 40-53, October.
    21. Christopher Hoag, 2015. "Clearinghouse Loan Certificates as Interbank Loans," Working Papers 1504, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2015.
    22. Daniel Sanches, 2016. "On The Welfare Properties Of Fractional Reserve Banking," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 57, pages 935-954, August.
    23. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.
    24. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Bank Executive Experience with Clearinghouse Loan Certificates," Working Papers 1903, Trinity College, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Ellis W. Tallman & Jon R. Moen, 2018. "The transmission of the financial crisis in 1907: an empirical investigation," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 277-312, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.

    Cited by:

    1. Rockoff, Hugh, 2015. "O.M.W. Sprague (the man who “wrote the book” on financial crises) and the founding of the Federal Reserve," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 35-45.
    2. Robert L. Hetzel, 2014. "The Real Bills Views of the Founders of the Fed," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 2Q, pages 159-181.
    3. Calomiris, Charles W. & Carlson, Mark, 2017. "Interbank networks in the National Banking Era: Their purpose and their role in the Panic of 1893," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(3), pages 434-453.
    4. Gary Gorton & Ellis W. Tallman, 2016. "How Did Pre-Fed Banking Panics End?," NBER Working Papers 22036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Christopher Hoag, 2015. "Clearinghouse Loan Certificates as a Lender of Last Resort," Working Papers 1503, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2015.
    6. Hoag, Christopher, 2018. "Clearinghouse loan certificates as a lender of last resort," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 215-229.
    7. Kim Abildgren, 2017. "Determinants of banks’ capital structure in the Pre-Regulation Era," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 64-82.
    8. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Close but not a central bank: The New York Clearing House and issues of clearing house loan certificates," Working Papers (Old Series) 1308, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.
    9. Mark A. Carlson, 2013. "Lessons from the historical use of reserve requirements in the United States to promote bank liquidity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Liquidity and Borrowing from a Lender of Last Resort during the Crisis of 1884," Working Papers 1901, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2019.
    11. Christopher Hoag, 2015. "Clearinghouse Loan Certificates as Interbank Loans," Working Papers 1504, Trinity College, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2015.
    12. Caroline Fohlin & Thomas Gehrig & Marlene Haas, 2016. "Rumors and Runs in Opaque Markets: Evidence from the Panic of 1907," CESifo Working Paper Series 6048, CESifo.
    13. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.
    14. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Bank Executive Experience with Clearinghouse Loan Certificates," Working Papers 1903, Trinity College, Department of Economics.

  3. Moen, Jon R. & Tallman, Ellis W., 2000. "Clearinghouse Membership and Deposit Contraction during the Panic of 1907," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 145-163, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Tallman, Ellis & Moen, Jon, 1998. "Gold Shocks, Liquidity, and the United States Economy during the National Banking Era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 381-404, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Rockoff, Hugh, 2015. "O.M.W. Sprague (the man who “wrote the book” on financial crises) and the founding of the Federal Reserve," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 35-45.
    2. Green, Georgina, 2018. "Monetary policy spillovers in the first age of financial globalisation: a narrative VAR approach 1884–1913," Bank of England working papers 718, Bank of England.
    3. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2010. "Liquidity creation without a lender of last resort: clearing house loan certificates in the Banking Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1010, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
    4. Kerry A. Odell & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2002. "Real Shock, Monetary Aftershock: The San Francisco Earthquake and the Panic of 1907," NBER Working Papers 9176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Quinn, Stephen & Roberds, William, 2014. "How Amsterdam got fiat money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 1-12.
    6. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.

  5. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1995. "Private sector responses to the Panic of 1907: a comparison of New York and Chicago," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, vol. 80(Mar), pages 1-9.

    Cited by:

    1. METAXAS, Theodore & TROMPATZI, Georgia, 2015. "From The Bank Panic Of 1907 To The Great Depression Of 1929 And The Savings And Loan Crisis Of The 1980s: Comparative Analysis And Lessons For The Future," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(1), pages 79-96.
    2. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2010. "Liquidity creation without a lender of last resort: clearing house loan certificates in the Banking Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1010, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
    3. Tallman, Ellis & Moen, Jon, 1998. "Gold Shocks, Liquidity, and the United States Economy during the National Banking Era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 381-404, October.
    4. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.

  6. Moen, Jon & Tallman, Ellis W., 1992. "The Bank Panic of 1907: The Role of Trust Companies," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(3), pages 611-630, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew S. Jaremski, 2017. "The (Dis)Advantages of Clearinghouses Before the Fed," NBER Working Papers 23113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. METAXAS, Theodore & TROMPATZI, Georgia, 2015. "From The Bank Panic Of 1907 To The Great Depression Of 1929 And The Savings And Loan Crisis Of The 1980s: Comparative Analysis And Lessons For The Future," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(1), pages 79-96.
    3. Eric Hilt, 2009. "Wall Street's First Corporate Governance Crisis: The Panic of 1826," NBER Working Papers 14892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Chen, Zhuo & He, Zhiguo & Liu, Chun, 2020. "The financing of local government in China: Stimulus loan wanes and shadow banking waxes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 137(1), pages 42-71.
    5. Tallman, Ellis & Moen, Jon, 1998. "Gold Shocks, Liquidity, and the United States Economy during the National Banking Era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 381-404, October.
    6. Gary Gorton, 2008. "The panic of 2007," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 131-262.
    7. Matthew S. Jaremski & David C. Wheelock, 2019. "The Founding of the Federal Reserve, the Great Depression and the Evolution of the U.S. Interbank Network," NBER Working Papers 26034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Gary B. Gorton, 2008. "The Subprime Panic," NBER Working Papers 14398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Charles W. Calomiris & Gary Gorton, 1991. "The Origins of Banking Panics: Models, Facts, and Bank Regulation," NBER Chapters, in: Financial Markets and Financial Crises, pages 109-174, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Gary Gorton & Andrew Winton, 2002. "Financial Intermediation," NBER Working Papers 8928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Gareth Campbell & Meeghan Rogers, 2017. "Integration between the London and New York Stock Exchanges, 1825–1925," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1185-1218, November.
    12. Daniel R. Sanches, 2013. "Banking crises and the role of bank coalitions," Working Papers 13-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2013.
    13. Michael D. Bordo & Angela Redish & Hugh Rockoff, 2015. "Why didn't Canada have a banking crisis in 2008 (or in 1930, or 1907, or …)?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 218-243, February.
    14. Michael D. Bordo & Angela Redish & Hugh Rockoff, 2011. "Why didn't Canada have a banking crisis in 2008 (or in 1930, or 1907, or ...)?," NBER Working Papers 17312, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Larry D. Wall, 2010. "Too-big-to-fail after FDICIA," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, vol. 95(1).
    16. Ellis W. Tallman & Jon R. Moen, 2018. "The transmission of the financial crisis in 1907: an empirical investigation," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 277-312, May.
    17. Daniel R. Sanches, 2015. "On the welfare properties of fractional reserve banking," Working Papers 15-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 14 Apr 2015.
    18. Gary Gorton & Ellis W. Tallman, 2016. "How Did Pre-Fed Banking Panics End?," NBER Working Papers 22036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Matthew Jaremski & Peter L. Rousseau, 2015. "The Dawn of an ‘Age of Deposits’ in the United States," NBER Working Papers 21503, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Bank Executive Experience in a Financial Crisis," Working Papers 1902, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
    21. Laurent Le Maux & Laurence Scialom, 2013. "Central banks and financial stability: rediscovering the lender-of-last-resort practice in a finance economy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(1), pages 1-16.
    22. Jaremski, Matthew, 2015. "Clearinghouses as credit regulators before the fed?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 10-21.
    23. Ellis W. Tallman & Elmus R. Wicker, 2010. "Banking and financial crises in United States history: what guidance can history offer policymakers?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1009, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
    24. Moen, Jon & Tallman, Ellis, 2018. "Outside Lending in the New York City Call Loan Market," MPRA Paper 88733, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.
    26. Fohlin, Caroline & Gehrig, Thomas & Haas, Marlene, 2015. "Rumors and Runs in Opaque Markets: Evidence from the Panic of 1907," CEPR Discussion Papers 10497, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    27. David Escamilla-Guerrero & Moramay Lopez-Alonso, 2019. "Self-selection of Mexican migrants in the presence of random shocks: Evidence from the Panic of 1907," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-23, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    28. Eugene N. White, 2011. ""To Establish a More Effective Supervision of Banking": How the Birth of the Fed Altered Bank Supervision," NBER Working Papers 16825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    29. Vives, Xavier, 2019. "Competition and stability in modern banking: A post-crisis perspective," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 55-69.
    30. Gehrig, Thomas Paul & Fohlin, Caroline & Haas, Marlene, 2015. "Liquidty Freezes and Market Runs; Evidencefrom the Panic of 1907," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113008, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    31. Ramírez, Carlos D., 2009. "Bank fragility, "money under the mattress", and long-run growth: US evidence from the "perfect" Panic of 1893," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 2185-2198, December.
    32. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2014. "Outside Lending in the NYC Call Loan Market," Working Papers (Old Series) 1408, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 27 Aug 2014.
    33. David Escamilla-Guerrero & Moramay Lopez-Alonso, 2020. "Migrant self-selection in the presence of random shocks. Evidence from the Panic of 1907," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _179, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    34. Daniel Sanches, 2016. "On The Welfare Properties Of Fractional Reserve Banking," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 57, pages 935-954, August.
    35. Chwieroth, Jeffrey M. & Walter, Andrew, 2019. "The financialization of mass wealth, banking crises and politics over the long run," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100765, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    36. Bradley Ewing & Mark Thompson & Mark Yanochik, 2007. "Using volume to forecast stock market volatility around the time of the 1929 crash," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(14), pages 1123-1128.
    37. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.
    38. Christopher Hoag, 2019. "Bank Executive Experience with Clearinghouse Loan Certificates," Working Papers 1903, Trinity College, Department of Economics.

  7. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 1990. "Lessons from the panic of 1907," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue May, pages 2-13.

    Cited by:

    1. METAXAS, Theodore & TROMPATZI, Georgia, 2015. "From The Bank Panic Of 1907 To The Great Depression Of 1929 And The Savings And Loan Crisis Of The 1980s: Comparative Analysis And Lessons For The Future," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(1), pages 79-96.
    2. Eric Hilt, 2009. "Wall Street's First Corporate Governance Crisis: The Panic of 1826," NBER Working Papers 14892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Christopher Hanes & Paul W. Rhode, 2012. "Harvests and Financial Crises in Gold-Standard America," NBER Working Papers 18616, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Margaret M. Jacobson & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Liquidity provision during the crisis of 1914: private and public sources," Working Papers (Old Series) 1304, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.
    5. Brownlees, Christian & Chabot, Ben & Ghysels, Eric & Kurz, Christopher, 2020. "Back to the future: Backtesting systemic risk measures during historical bank runs and the great depression," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 113(C).
    6. Ellis W. Tallman & Jon R. Moen, 2018. "The transmission of the financial crisis in 1907: an empirical investigation," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 277-312, May.
    7. Kwasnicki, Witold, 2013. "Panika roku 1907 – kryzys finansowy 2008,Sto lat budowania kreatywnego kapitalizmu
      [The panic in 1907 - the financial crisis in 2008. One hundred years of creative capitalism building]
      ," MPRA Paper 53687, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Donaldson, Jason Roderick & Piacentino, Giorgia, 2019. "Money Runs," CEPR Discussion Papers 13955, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Robert L. Hetzel, 2009. "Should increased regulation of bank risk-taking come from regulators or from the market?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 95(Spr), pages 161-200.
    10. Ellis W. Tallman & Elmus R. Wicker, 2010. "Banking and financial crises in United States history: what guidance can history offer policymakers?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1009, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2010.
    11. Kupiec, Paul H. & Ramirez, Carlos D., 2013. "Bank failures and the cost of systemic risk: Evidence from 1900 to 1930," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 285-307.
    12. Jason R. Donaldson & Giorgia Piacentino, 2019. "Money Runs," NBER Working Papers 26298, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Fohlin, Caroline & Gehrig, Thomas & Haas, Marlene, 2015. "Rumors and Runs in Opaque Markets: Evidence from the Panic of 1907," CEPR Discussion Papers 10497, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Gehrig, Thomas Paul & Fohlin, Caroline & Haas, Marlene, 2015. "Liquidty Freezes and Market Runs; Evidencefrom the Panic of 1907," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113008, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    15. Carola Frydman & Eric Hilt & Lily Y. Zhou, 2015. "Economic Effects of Runs on Early "Shadow Banks": Trust Companies and the Impact of the Panic of 1907," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(4), pages 902-940.
    16. Trompatzi, Georgia & Metaxas, Theodore, 2013. "From the Bank Panic of 1907 to the Great Depression of 1929 and the Savings and Loan Crisis of the 1980s: Lessons for the future," MPRA Paper 48272, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Brownlees, Christian & Chabot, Ben & Ghysels, Eric & Kurz, Christopher, 2017. "Back to the Future: Backtesting Systemic Risk Measures during Historical Bank Runs and the Great Depression," CEPR Discussion Papers 12178, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Papers (Old Series) 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2012.

  8. Jon R. Moen, 1988. "Past and current trends in retirement: American men from 1860 to 1980," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jul, pages 16-27.

    Cited by:

    1. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & David N. Weil, 2004. "Mortality Change, the Uncertainty Effect, and Retirement," Working Papers 2004-04, Department of Economics, University of Houston.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (8) 2000-01-31 2004-02-29 2004-02-29 2006-12-16 2010-08-14 2013-06-09 2014-09-05 2014-09-29. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (5) 2000-01-31 2004-02-29 2004-02-29 2010-08-14 2013-06-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-BAN: Banking (3) 2006-12-16 2013-06-09 2014-09-05
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2004-02-29 2014-09-29
  5. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2013-06-09
  6. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (1) 2014-09-05
  7. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2014-09-29

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Jon Roger Moen should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.