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Gabriel Patrick Mathy

Personal Details

First Name:Gabriel
Middle Name:Patrick
Last Name:Mathy
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1446
http://gabrielmathy.weebly.com/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
American University

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.american.edu/cas/economics/

(202)885-3770

4400 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20016-8029
RePEc:edi:deameus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jaremski, Matthew & Mathy, Gabrial, 2017. "Looking Back On the Age of Checking in America, 1800-1960," MPRA Paper 78083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Gabriel Mathy & Daniel Kirwin, 2017. "How did forecasters respond to the American growth slowdown since the mid-2000s?," Working Papers 2017-02, American University, Department of Economics.
  3. Gabriel P. Mathy & Matthew Jaremski, 2016. "How Was the Quantitative Easing Program of the 1930s Unwound?," Working Papers 2016-01, American University, Department of Economics.
  4. Gabriel Mathy & Herman O. Stekler, 2016. "Expectations and Forecasting during the Great Depression: Real-Time Evidence from the Business Press," Working Papers 2016-011, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
  5. Gabriel P. Mathy, 2015. "Hysteresis and Persistent Long-Term Unemployment: Lessons from the Great Depression and World War II," Working Papers 2015-02, American University, Department of Economics.
  6. Gabriel P. Mathy, 2014. "Uncertainty Shocks and Equity Return Jumps and Volatility During the Great Depression," Working Papers 2014-02, American University, Department of Economics.
  7. Gabriel P. Mathy & Nicholas L. Ziebarth, 2014. "How Much Does Political Uncertainty Matter? The Case of Louisiana Under Huey Long," Working Papers 2014-06, American University, Department of Economics.
  8. Gabriel P. Mathy & Christopher M. Meissner, 2011. "Trade, Exchange Rate Regimes and Output Co-Movement: Evidence from the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 16925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Mathy, Gabriel & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2017. "How Much Does Political Uncertainty Matter? The Case of Louisiana under Huey Long," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 90-126, March.
  2. Mathy, Gabriel P., 2016. "Stock volatility, return jumps and uncertainty shocks during the Great Depression," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(2), pages 165-192, August.
  3. Mathy, Gabriel P., 2014. "Fortune Tellers: The Story of America's First Economic Forecasters.. By Walter A. Friedman. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2013. Pp. ix, 273. $29.95, hardcover," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(4), pages 1244-1246, December.
  4. Mathy, Gabriel P. & Meissner, Christopher M., 2011. "Business cycle co-movement: Evidence from the Great Depression," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 362-372.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Gabriel P. Mathy & Matthew Jaremski, 2016. "How Was the Quantitative Easing Program of the 1930s Unwound?," Working Papers 2016-01, American University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel Mathy & Christian Roatta, 2018. "Forecasting the 1937-1938 Recession: Quantifying Contemporary Newspaper Forecasts," Working Papers 2018-004, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
    2. Andrew Bossie, 2020. "Monetary and fiscal interactions in the USA during the 1940s," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 14(1), pages 61-103, January.

  2. Gabriel Mathy & Herman O. Stekler, 2016. "Expectations and Forecasting during the Great Depression: Real-Time Evidence from the Business Press," Working Papers 2016-011, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.

    Cited by:

    1. Foltas, Alexander, 2020. "Testing investment forecast efficiency with textual data," Working Papers 19, German Research Foundation's Priority Programme 1859 "Experience and Expectation. Historical Foundations of Economic Behaviour", Humboldt University Berlin.
    2. J. Daniel Aromí, 2018. "GDP growth forecasts and information flows: Is there evidence of overreactions?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 122-139, June.
    3. Gabriel Mathy & Herman Stekler, 2018. "Was the deflation of the depression anticipated? An inference using real-time data," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(2), pages 117-125, April.
    4. Tara M. Sinclair, 2019. "Continuities and Discontinuities in Economic Forecasting," Working Papers 2019-003, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
    5. Glocker, Christian & Kaniovski, Serguei, 2020. "Structural modeling and forecasting using a cluster of dynamic factor models," MPRA Paper 101874, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Gabriel Mathy & Christian Roatta, 2018. "Forecasting the 1937-1938 Recession: Quantifying Contemporary Newspaper Forecasts," Working Papers 2018-004, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
    7. Ulrich Fritsche & Johannes Puckelwald, 2018. "Deciphering Professional Forecasters’ Stories - Analyzing a Corpus of Textual Predictions for the German Economy," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 201804, University of Hamburg, Department of Socioeconomics.

  3. Gabriel P. Mathy, 2015. "Hysteresis and Persistent Long-Term Unemployment: Lessons from the Great Depression and World War II," Working Papers 2015-02, American University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Moses Kpughur Tule & Moses Onyema Oduh & Charles Chike Chiemeke & Obiageri Christiana Ndukwe, 2018. "An Assessment of the Severity of Unemployment in Nigeria: Evidence from Fractional Integration," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 39-61, January.
    2. Ifedolapo Olabisi Olanipekun & Seyi Saint Akadiri & Osundina Olawumi & Festus Victor Bekun, 2017. "Does Labor Market Hysteresis Hold in Low Income Countries?," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 19-23.

  4. Gabriel P. Mathy, 2014. "Uncertainty Shocks and Equity Return Jumps and Volatility During the Great Depression," Working Papers 2014-02, American University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Binder, Carola Conces, 2016. "Estimation of historical inflation expectations," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-31.

  5. Gabriel P. Mathy & Nicholas L. Ziebarth, 2014. "How Much Does Political Uncertainty Matter? The Case of Louisiana Under Huey Long," Working Papers 2014-06, American University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Pencho Penchev, 2017. "Of the Essence and Meaning of Economic History," Proceedings of the Centre for Economic History Research, Centre for Economic History Research, vol. 2, pages 9-34, November.
    2. Miguel Morin, 2015. "The Labor Market Consequences of Electricity Adoption: Concrete Evidence from the Great Depression," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1554, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2015. "The Great Depression Through the Eyes of the Census of Manufactures," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(4), pages 185-194, October.
    4. La-Bhus Fah Jirasavetakul & Antonio Spilimbergo, 2018. "Economic Policy Uncertainty in Turkey," IMF Working Papers 18/272, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Pierdzioch Christian & Gupta Rangan, 2020. "Uncertainty and Forecasts of U.S. Recessions," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 24(4), pages 1-20, September.
    6. Lennard, Jason, 2018. "Uncertainty and the Great Slump," Lund Papers in Economic History 170, Lund University, Department of Economic History, revised 14 May 2019.
    7. Jalil, Andrew J. & Rua, Gisela, 2016. "Inflation expectations and recovery in spring 1933," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 26-50.
    8. Jirasavetakul, La-Bhus Fah & Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2018. "Economic Policy Uncertainty in Turkey," CEPR Discussion Papers 13352, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. Mathy, Gabriel & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2017. "How Much Does Political Uncertainty Matter? The Case of Louisiana under Huey Long," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 90-126, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Mathy, Gabriel P., 2016. "Stock volatility, return jumps and uncertainty shocks during the Great Depression," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(2), pages 165-192, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Hanedar, Avni Önder & Yaldız Hanedar, Elmas, 2017. "Stock market reactions to wars and political risks: A cliometric perspective for a falling empire," MPRA Paper 85600, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Mar 2018.
    2. Gustavo S. Cortes & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2017. "Stock Volatility and the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 23554, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Mathy, Gabriel & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2017. "How Much Does Political Uncertainty Matter? The Case of Louisiana under Huey Long," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 90-126, March.
    4. Hanedar, Avni Önder & Hanedar, Elmas Yaldız, 2017. "Ottoman stock returns during the Turco-Italian and Balkan Wars of 1910-1914," eabh Papers 17-02, The European Association for Banking and Financial History (EABH).
    5. Gabriel Mathy & Herman O. Stekler, 2016. "Expectations and Forecasting during the Great Depression: Real-Time Evidence from the Business Press," Working Papers 2016-011, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
    6. Gabriel Mathy & Christian Roatta, 2018. "Forecasting the 1937-1938 Recession: Quantifying Contemporary Newspaper Forecasts," Working Papers 2018-004, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
    7. Gabriel P. Mathy, 2020. "How much did uncertainty shocks matter in the Great Depression?," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 14(2), pages 283-323, May.

  3. Mathy, Gabriel P. & Meissner, Christopher M., 2011. "Business cycle co-movement: Evidence from the Great Depression," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 362-372.

    Cited by:

    1. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & De Santis, Roberta & Girardi, Alessandro, 2015. "Trade intensity and output synchronisation: On the endogeneity properties of EMU," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 154-163.
    2. Albers, Thilo & Uebele, Martin, 2015. "The global impact of the great depression," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64491, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Roberta De Santis & Alessandro Girardi, 2013. "Trade Intensity and Output Synchronisation: On the Endogeneity Properties of EMU," CESifo Working Paper Series 4172, CESifo.
    4. Kim, Kyunghun & Pyun, Ju Hyun, 2018. "Exchange rate regimes and the international transmission of business cycles: Capital account openness matters," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 44-61.
    5. Albers, Thilo Nils Hendrik, 2018. "The prelude and global impact of the Great Depression: Evidence from a new macroeconomic dataset," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 150-163.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (8) 2011-04-16 2014-02-15 2014-08-28 2015-04-11 2016-03-17 2016-12-04 2017-04-30 2017-09-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (7) 2011-04-16 2014-02-15 2015-04-11 2016-12-04 2017-02-12 2017-04-30 2017-09-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (3) 2011-04-16 2016-03-17 2017-09-24. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (2) 2016-03-17 2017-09-24
  5. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2017-09-24
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2015-04-11
  7. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (1) 2011-04-16
  8. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2017-04-30
  9. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2014-08-28
  10. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2014-02-15

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