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Inflation expectations and recovery in spring 1933

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  • Jalil, Andrew J.
  • Rua, Gisela

Abstract

This paper uses the historical narrative record to determine whether inflation expectations shifted during the second quarter of 1933, precisely as the recovery from the Great Depression took hold. First, by examining the historical news record and the forecasts of contemporary business analysts, we show that inflation expectations increased dramatically. Second, using an event-study approach, we identify the effect of the key events that shifted inflation expectations on financial markets. Third, we gather new evidence—both quantitative and narrative—that indicates that the shift in inflation expectations played a causal role in stimulating the recovery.

Suggested Citation

  • Jalil, Andrew J. & Rua, Gisela, 2016. "Inflation expectations and recovery in spring 1933," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 26-50.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:62:y:2016:i:c:p:26-50
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eeh.2016.07.001
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    1. Qu’aurait fait Roosevelt face à la crise économique du Covid19 ?
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    5. Poelmans, Eline & Taylor, Jason E. & Raisanen, Samuel & Holt, Andrew C., 2022. "Estimates of employment gains attributable to beer legalization in spring 1933," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
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    7. Daniel, Volker & ter Steege, Lucas, 2018. "Inflation Expectations and the Recovery from the Great Depression in Germany," Working Papers 6, German Research Foundation's Priority Programme 1859 "Experience and Expectation. Historical Foundations of Economic Behaviour", Humboldt University Berlin.
    8. Daniel, Volker & Steege, Lucas ter, 2020. "Inflation expectations and the recovery from the Great Depression in Germany," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    9. Bernardo Candia & Mathieu Pedemonte, 2021. "Export-Led Decay: The Trade Channel in the Gold Standard Era," Working Papers 21-11r, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 08 Nov 2021.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    E31; E32; E12; N42; Inflation expectations; Great Depression; Narrative evidence; Liquidity trap; Regime change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian; Modern Monetary Theory
    • N42 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-

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