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Monetary Policy, Loan Liquidation, and Industrial Conflict: The Federal Reserve and the Open Market Operations of 1932

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  • Epstein, Gerald
  • Ferguson, Thomas

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  • Epstein, Gerald & Ferguson, Thomas, 1984. "Monetary Policy, Loan Liquidation, and Industrial Conflict: The Federal Reserve and the Open Market Operations of 1932," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(04), pages 957-983, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:44:y:1984:i:04:p:957-983_03
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    Cited by:

    1. Barry Eichengreen, 1998. "Exchange Rate Stability and Financial Stability," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 569-608, January.
    2. Damette, Olivier & Parent, Antoine, 2016. "Did the Fed follow an implicit McCallum rule during the Great Depression?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 226-232.
    3. Bilgili, Faik, 2001. "The Keynesian-Monetarist Debate on Business Cycles: A Case Study of The Great Depression," MPRA Paper 75539, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Eichengreen, Barry, 2014. "Doctrinal determinants, domestic and international of Federal Reserve policy, 1914-1933," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 195, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    5. Buiter, Willem H., 2008. "Central banks and financial crises," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 495-633.
    6. Hallwood, C. Paul & MacDonald, Ronald & Marsh, Ian W., 1997. "Crash! Expectational Aspects of the Departures of the United Kingdom and the United States from the Inter-War Gold Standard," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 174-194, April.
    7. Jalil, Andrew J. & Rua, Gisela, 2016. "Inflation expectations and recovery in spring 1933," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 26-50.
    8. Charles Calomiris & David Wheelock, 1998. "Was the Great Depression a Watershed for American Monetary Policy?," NBER Chapters,in: The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century, pages 23-66 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Thomas Ferguson & Robert Johnson, 2013. "When wolves cry ‘wolf’: systemic financial crises and the myth of the Danaid Jar," Chapters,in: Monetary Economies of Production, chapter 7, pages 73-98 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Tatom, John A., 2014. "U.S. monetary policy in disarray," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 47-58.
    11. Eichengreen, Barry & Portes, Richard, 1986. "The Anatomy of Financial Crises," CEPR Discussion Papers 130, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Bordo, Michael D., 1986. "Explorations in monetary history: A survey of the literature," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 339-415, October.
    13. Michael D. Bordo, 1988. "The Contribution of a Monetary History of the United States: 1867 to 1960 To Monetary History," NBER Working Papers 2549, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Jan Kregel, 2009. "It's That 'Vision' Thing: Why the Bailouts Aren't Working, and Why a New Financial System Is Needed," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_100, Levy Economics Institute.
    15. Tatom, John, 2011. "Monetary policy in disarray," MPRA Paper 34607, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Walker F. Todd, 1994. "The Federal Reserve Board before Marriner Eccles (1931-1934)," Working Paper 9405, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

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