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Dr Stephanie Levy

Personal Details

First Name:Stephanie
Middle Name:
Last Name:Levy
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple376
https://www.lse.ac.uk/international-development/people/fellows/stephanie-levy
Department of International Development London School of Economics Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, UK

Affiliation

Department of International Development
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/internationalDevelopment/
RePEc:edi:dslseuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie & Hernández, Victor & Davies, Rob & Gabriel, Sherwin & Arndt, Channing & van Seventer, Dirk & Pleitez, Marcelo, 2021. "Covid-19 and lockdown policies: A structural simulation model of a bottom-up recession in four countries," IFPRI discussion papers 2015, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Arndt, Channing & Davies, Rob & Gabriel, Sherwin & Harris, Laurence & Makrelov, Konstantin & Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie & Simbanegavi, Witness & van Seventer, Dirk & Anderson, Lillian, 2020. "Covid-19 lockdowns, income distribution, and food security: an analysis for South Africa," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 105814, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Bennett, John & Levy, Stephanie, 2018. "Family Ceremonies as a Constraint on Informal Sector Investment: The Case of Sénégal," IZA Discussion Papers 11529, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. Stephanie Levy, 2015. "The Impact of Cash Transfers on Local Economies," Poverty In Focus 31, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  5. Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie, 2014. "Can cash transfers promote the local economy? A case study for Cambodia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1334, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Stephanie Levy & Sherman Robinson, 2014. "Maximizing the Economic Impact of Cash Transfers: why Complementary Investment Matters," One Pager 255, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  7. Stephanie Levy & Sherman Robinson, 2014. "Maximiser l'impact économique des transferts monétaires: le rôle des investissements publics agricoles," One Pager French 255, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  8. Levy, Stephanie, 2006. "Public investment to reverse Dutch disease: the case of Chad," DSGD discussion papers 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Articles

  1. Stephanie Levy, 2007. "The African Manufacturing Firm: An Analysis based on Firms' Surveys in Seven Countries in Sub‐Saharan Africa. By DIPAK MAZUMDAR and ATA MAZAHERI," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(293), pages 183-184, February.
  2. Stephanie Levy, 2007. "Public Investment to Reverse Dutch Disease: The Case of Chad," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(3), pages 439-484, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Arndt, Channing & Davies, Rob & Gabriel, Sherwin & Harris, Laurence & Makrelov, Konstantin & Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie & Simbanegavi, Witness & van Seventer, Dirk & Anderson, Lillian, 2020. "Covid-19 lockdowns, income distribution, and food security: an analysis for South Africa," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 105814, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Diosey Ramon Lugo-Morin, 2021. "Global Mapping of Indigenous Resilience Facing the Challenge of the COVID-19 Pandemic," Challenges, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(1), pages 1-23, May.
    2. Amare, Mulubrhan & Abay, Kibrom A. & Tiberti, Luca & Chamberlin, Jordan, 2020. "Impacts of COVID-19 on food security: Panel data evidence from Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1956, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Kansiime, Monica K. & Tambo, Justice A. & Mugambi, Idah & Bundi, Mary & Kara, Augustine & Owuor, Charles, 2021. "COVID-19 implications on household income and food security in Kenya and Uganda: Findings from a rapid assessment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    4. Marwa Ben Abdallah & Maria Fekete-Farkas & Zoltan Lakner, 2021. "Exploring the Link between Food Security and Food Price Dynamics: A Bibliometric Analysis," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-19, March.
    5. Trudell, John Paul & Burnet, Maddison L. & Ziegler, Bianca R. & Luginaah, Isaac, 2021. "The impact of food insecurity on mental health in Africa: A systematic review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 278(C).
    6. Jianqing Ruan & Qingwen Cai & Songqing Jin, 2021. "Impact of COVID‐19 and Nationwide Lockdowns on Vegetable Prices: Evidence from Wholesale Markets in China," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 103(5), pages 1574-1594, October.
    7. Elvis J Davis & Gustavo Amorim & Bernice Dahn & Troy D Moon, 2021. "Perceived ability to comply with national COVID-19 mitigation strategies and their impact on household finances, food security, and mental well-being of medical and pharmacy students in Liberia," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(7), pages 1-13, July.
    8. Ilan Strauss & Gilad Isaacs & Josh Rosenberg, 2021. "The effect of shocks to GDP on employment in SADC member states during COVID‐19 using a Bayesian hierarchical model," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(S1), pages 221-237, April.
    9. Cleopatra Oluseye Ibukun & Abayomi Ayinla Adebayo, 2021. "Household food security and the COVID‐19 pandemic in Nigeria," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(S1), pages 75-87, April.
    10. Amare, Mulubrhan & Abay, Kibrom A. & Tiberti, Luca & Chamberlin, Jordan, 2021. "COVID-19 and food security: Panel data evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    11. Adjognon, Guigonan Serge & Bloem, Jeffrey R. & Sanoh, Aly, 2021. "The coronavirus pandemic and food security: Evidence from Mali," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    12. Samuel Kwaku Agyei & Zangina Isshaq & Siaw Frimpong & Anokye Mohammed Adam & Ahmed Bossman & Oliver Asiamah, 2021. "COVID‐19 and food prices in sub‐Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(S1), pages 102-113, April.
    13. Hemant G. Tripathi & Harriet E. Smith & Steven M. Sait & Susannah M. Sallu & Stephen Whitfield & Astrid Jankielsohn & William E. Kunin & Ndumiso Mazibuko & Bonani Nyhodo, 2021. "Impacts of COVID-19 on Diverse Farm Systems in Tanzania and South Africa," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(17), pages 1-16, September.

  2. Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie, 2014. "Can cash transfers promote the local economy? A case study for Cambodia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1334, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Eric ROUGIER & François COMBARNOUS & Yves-André FAURE, 2017. "The ‘local economy’ effect of social transfers: A municipality-level analysis of the local growth impact of the Bolsa Familia Programme in the Brazilian Nordeste," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2017-09, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    2. Eric Rougier & Yves-Andre Faure & Francois Combarnous, 2018. "The “Local Economy” Effect of Social Transfers: An Empirical Assessment of the Impact of the Bolsa Família Program on Local Productive Structure and Economic Growth," Post-Print hal-03122732, HAL.
    3. Juan M. Villa, 2014. "Social Transfers and Growth: The Missing Evidence from Luminosity Data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-090, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  3. Levy, Stephanie, 2006. "Public investment to reverse Dutch disease: the case of Chad," DSGD discussion papers 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Edouard Mien & M Goujon, 2021. "40 Years of Dutch Disease Literature: Lessons for Developing Countries," Working Papers hal-03256078, HAL.
    2. Johnson, Michael E. & Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Gyimah-Brempong, Kwabena, 2013. "Assessing the potential and policy alternatives for achieving rice competitiveness and growth in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1301, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Luc Savard & Dorothée Boccanfuso & Marcelin Joanis & Patrick Richard, 2012. "A Comparative Analysis of Funding Schemes for Public Infrastructure Spending in Quebec," EcoMod2012 4633, EcoMod.
    4. Harald SCHMIDBAUER & Ece DEMIREL, 2010. "Monetary Authorities and Exchange Rate Volatility: Turkey and other Cases," EcoMod2010 259600150, EcoMod.
    5. Arsham Reisinezhad, 2018. "Economic Growth and Income Inequality in Resource Countries: Theory and Evidence," PSE Working Papers halshs-01707976, HAL.
    6. Issoufou SOUMAILA, 2015. "Escaping the Dutch Disease: The Role of Public Investment in Niger," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(2), pages 333-339, February.
    7. Sandrine Kablan & Josef Loening & Yasuhiro Tanaka, 2014. "Is Chad Affected by Dutch or Nigerian Disease?," Journal of Empirical Economics, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 3(5), pages 278-295.
    8. Elizavetta Dorinet & Pierre-André Jouvet & Julien Wolfersberger, 2021. "Is The Agricultural Sector Cursed Too? Evidence From Sub-Saharan Africa [Le secteur agricole est-il lui aussi maudit ? Témoignages d'Afrique subsaharienne]," Post-Print hal-03036437, HAL.
    9. Sandrine A. Kablan & Josef L. Loening, 2012. "An empirical assessment of the Dutch disease channel of the resource curse: the case of Chad," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(3), pages 2007-2014.
    10. World Bank, . "Economy-Wide Impact of Oil Discovery in Ghana," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 18903.
    11. Rafael Aguirre Unceta, 2018. "Niger : la Quête du Développement dans un Contexte Adverse," Working Papers hal-02046108, HAL.
    12. Ahmed, Vaqar & Abbas, Ahsan & Ahmed, Sofia, 2013. "Public Infrastructure and economic growth in Pakistan: a dynamic CGE-microsimulation analysis," PEP Working Papers 164414, Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP).
    13. Hannah Schürenberg-Frosch, 2014. "Improving Africa's Roads: Modelling Infrastructure Investment and Its Effect on Sectoral Production Behaviour," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(3), pages 327-353, May.
    14. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Marcelin Joanis & Mathieu Paquet & Luc Savard, 2015. "Impact de productivité des infrastructures: Une application au Québec," Cahiers de recherche 15-06, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    15. Viccaro, Mauro & Rocchi, Benedetto & Cozzi, Mario & Severino, Marino, 2015. "The socioeconomic impact derived from the oil royalty allocation on regional development," 2015 Fourth Congress, June 11-12, 2015, Ancona, Italy 207861, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    16. Loening, Josef L., 2010. "Chad: rural policy note," MPRA Paper 28951, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Kyophilavong, Phouphet & Senesouphap, Chanthachone & Yawdhacksa, Somnack, 2013. "Resource Boom, Growth and Poverty in Laos; What Can We Learn From Other Countries and Policy Simulations?," PEP Working Papers 160434, Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP).
    18. Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie, 2014. "Can cash transfers promote the local economy? A case study for Cambodia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1334, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Hamzeh Arabzadeh, 2016. "Foreign Aid, Public Investment and Capital Market Liberalization," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2016018, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    20. Rafael AGUIRRE UNCETA, 2018. "Niger : la Quête du Développement dans un Contexte Adverse," Working Papers P247, FERDI.

Articles

  1. Stephanie Levy, 2007. "Public Investment to Reverse Dutch Disease: The Case of Chad," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(3), pages 439-484, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2006-09-23 2014-04-05
  2. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (2) 2006-09-23 2014-04-05
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2006-09-23 2014-04-05
  4. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (2) 2014-04-05 2015-09-05
  5. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2006-09-23
  6. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2020-09-21
  7. NEP-IUE: Informal & Underground Economics (1) 2018-06-25
  8. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2015-09-05
  9. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2021-07-12
  10. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2015-09-11
  11. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2015-09-05

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