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A comparative analysis of funding schemes for public infrastructure spending in Quebec

Listed author(s):
  • Dorothée Boccanfuso
  • Marcelin Joanis
  • Patrick Richard
  • Luc Savard

The economic literature has been investigating the positive relation between public infrastructure spending and the productivity of the private sector since Munnell (1992). We have introduced this relationship into a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium model of the Quebec economy to investigate various funding schemes to scale up infrastructure spending in the province. We draw our assumptions from Estache et al. (2010) combined with sectoral elasticity parameters. We conduct a comparative analysis where the funding comes from debt alone, and debt with sales tax, income tax and business tax. Our main finding is that the income tax seems to produce the most positive effects and the businesses tax the most negative effects, though differences are small.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2014.909576
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 46 (2014)
Issue (Month): 22 (August)
Pages: 2653-2664

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:46:y:2014:i:22:p:2653-2664
DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2014.909576
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  1. H. Ahmed & SM. Miller, 2000. "Crowding-out and crowding-in effects of the components of government expenditure," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(1), pages 124-133, 01.
  2. Luc Savard, 2010. "Scaling up infrastructure spending in the Philippines: A CGE top-down bottom-up microsimulation approach," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 3(1), pages 43-59.
  3. Gramlich, Edward M, 1994. "Infrastructure Investment: A Review Essay," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1176-1196, September.
  4. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
  5. Ballard, Charles L. & Fullerton, Don & Shoven, John B. & Whalley, John, 2009. "A General Equilibrium Model for Tax Policy Evaluation," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 0, number 9780226036335, September.
  6. Charles L. Ballard & Don Fullerton & John B. Shoven & John Whalley, 1985. "Introduction to "A General Equilibrium Model for Tax Policy Evaluation"," NBER Chapters,in: A General Equilibrium Model for Tax Policy Evaluation, pages 1-5 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Antonio Estache & L. Savard & D. Boccanfuso, 2009. "Impact Analysis of Electricity reforms in Senegal: A Macro-micro analysis," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/43904, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  8. Antonio Estache & Jean-François Perrault & Luc Savard, 2008. "Impact Of Infrastructure Spending In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Cge Modeling Approach," Cahiers de recherche 08-03, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
  9. Alicia H. Munnell, 1992. "Policy Watch: Infrastructure Investment and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 189-198, Fall.
  10. Stephanie Levy, 2007. "Public Investment to Reverse Dutch Disease: The Case of Chad," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(3), pages 439-484, June.
  11. Bernard Decaluwe & Andre Lemelin & David Bahan, 2010. "Endogenous Labour Supply with Several Occupational Categories in a Bi-regional Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1401-1414.
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