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Stephanie A. Heger

Personal Details

First Name:Stephanie
Middle Name:A.
Last Name:Heger
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phe760
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.stephanieheger.com
Terminal Degree: (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche
Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna

Bologna, Italy
https://dse.unibo.it/
RePEc:edi:sebolit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Gauriot, Romain & Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert, 2018. "Altruism or Diminishing Marginal Utility?," IZA Discussion Papers 11721, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Craig, Ashley C & Garbarino, Ellen & Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert, 2014. "Waiting To Give," IZA Discussion Papers 8491, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert & Tausch, Franziska & Tymula, Agnieszka, 2021. "Altruism among consumers as donors," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 189(C), pages 611-622.
  2. Gauriot, Romain & Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert, 2020. "Altruism or diminishing marginal utility?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 24-48.
  3. Stephanie A. Heger & Robert Slonim & Ellen Garbarino & Carmen Wang & Daniel Waller, 2020. "Redesigning the Market for Volunteers: A Donor Registry," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(8), pages 3528-3541, August.
  4. Heger, Stephanie A. & Papageorge, Nicholas W., 2018. "We should totally open a restaurant: How optimism and overconfidence affect beliefs," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 177-190.
  5. Ashley C. Craig & Ellen Garbarino & Stephanie A. Heger & Robert Slonim, 2017. "Waiting To Give: Stated and Revealed Preferences," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 63(11), pages 3672-3690, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Gauriot, Romain & Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert, 2018. "Altruism or Diminishing Marginal Utility?," IZA Discussion Papers 11721, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Christine L. Exley & Judd B. Kessler, 2019. "Motivated Errors," NBER Working Papers 26595, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Romain Gauriot & Stephanie A. Heger & Robert Slonim, 2022. "Eliciting Preferences for Risk and Altruism: Experimental Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 9993, CESifo.
    3. Miettinen, Topi & Kosfeld, Michael & Fehr, Ernst & Weibull, Jörgen, 2020. "Revealed preferences in a sequential prisoners’ dilemma: A horse-race between six utility functions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 1-25.
    4. Schwaninger, Manuel, 2022. "Sharing with the powerless third: Other-regarding preferences in dynamic bargaining," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 197(C), pages 341-355.
    5. Andersson Järnberg, Linda & Andrén, Daniela & Hultkrantz, Lars & Rutström, E.Elisabet & Vimefall, Elin, 2021. "Willingness to pay for private and public improvements of vulnerable road users’ safety," Working Papers 2021:11, Örebro University, School of Business.
    6. Keigo Inukai & Yuta Shimodaira & Kohei Shiozawa, 2022. "Revisiting CES utility functions for distributional preferences: Do people face the equality–efficiency trade-off?," ISER Discussion Paper 1195, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.

  2. Craig, Ashley C & Garbarino, Ellen & Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert, 2014. "Waiting To Give," IZA Discussion Papers 8491, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Slonim, Robert & Wang, Carmen, 2016. "Market Design for Altruistic Supply: Evidence from the Lab," IZA Discussion Papers 9650, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Taylor, Rebecca, 2018. "A Mixed Bag: The Hidden Time Costs of Regulating Consumer Behavior," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274129, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Nagurney, Anna & Dutta, Pritha, 2019. "Competition for blood donations," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 103-114.
    4. Muriel Niederle, 2014. "Gender," NBER Working Papers 20788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Anastasia Danilov & Timo Vogelsang, 2016. "Time for helping," Journal of the Economic Science Association, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 2(1), pages 36-47, May.
    6. Christine L. Exley & Stephen J. Terry, 2015. "Wage Elasticities in Working and Volunteering: The Role of Reference Points in a Laboratory Study," Harvard Business School Working Papers 16-062, Harvard Business School, revised Jun 2017.

Articles

  1. Gauriot, Romain & Heger, Stephanie A. & Slonim, Robert, 2020. "Altruism or diminishing marginal utility?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 24-48.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Stephanie A. Heger & Robert Slonim & Ellen Garbarino & Carmen Wang & Daniel Waller, 2020. "Redesigning the Market for Volunteers: A Donor Registry," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(8), pages 3528-3541, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Meyer, Christian Johannes & Tripodi, Egon, 2021. "Image concerns in pledges to give blood: Evidence from a field experiment," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).
    2. Briscese, Guglielmo & Leibbrandt, Andreas, 2022. "Designing the market for job vacancies: A trust experiment with employment centers staff," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    3. Haylock, Michael & Kampkötter, Patrick & Macis, Mario & Sauter, Jürgen & Seitz, Susanne & Slonim, Robert & Wiesen, Daniel & Schmidt, Alexander H., 2022. "Improving the Availability of Unrelated Stem Cell Donors: Evidence from a Major Donor Registry," IZA Discussion Papers 15096, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Fehérová, Martina & Heger, Stephanie & Péliová, Jana & Servátka, Maroš & Slonim, Robert, 2022. "Increasing autonomy in charitable giving: The effect of choosing the number of recipients on donations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 217(C).
    5. Lorenz Götte & Egon Tripodi, 2022. "Social Recognition: Experimental Evidence from Blood Donors," CESifo Working Paper Series 9719, CESifo.

  3. Heger, Stephanie A. & Papageorge, Nicholas W., 2018. "We should totally open a restaurant: How optimism and overconfidence affect beliefs," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 177-190.

    Cited by:

    1. Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus, 2021. "Time preferences and overconfident beliefs: Evidence from germany," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 92(C).
    2. Barron, Kai & Gravert, Christina, 2018. "Confidence and career choices: An experiment," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2018-301, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    3. Christine L. Exley & Judd B. Kessler, 2019. "Motivated Errors," NBER Working Papers 26595, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. César Mantilla & Zahra Murad, 2022. "Ego-relevance in team production," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2022-01, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
    5. Pannenberg, Markus & Friehe, Tim, 2019. "Does it really get better with age? Life-cycle patterns of confidence in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203497, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Bauer, Dominik & Wolff, Irenaeus, 2021. "Biases in Belief Reports," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242458, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Shin, Su Hyun & Kim, Kyoung Tae & Seay, Martin, 2020. "Sources of information and portfolio allocation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    8. Cheung, Stephen L. & Johnstone, Lachlan, 2017. "True Overconfidence, Revealed through Actions: An Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 10545, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus, 2019. "Overconfidence over the lifespan: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    10. Grevenbrock, Nils, 2020. "Dispositional optimism (and pessimism), wealth, and stock market participation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 81(C).
    11. Claus, Edda & Nguyen, Viet Hoang, 2023. "Biased expectations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 154(C).
    12. Uri Gneezy & Moshe Hoffman & Mark A. Lane & John List & Jeffrey Livingston & Michael J. Seiler, 2022. "Can Wishful Thinking Explain Evidence for Overconfidence? An Experiment on Belief Updating," Artefactual Field Experiments 00753, The Field Experiments Website.
    13. Takunori Ishihara & Takanori Ida, 2022. "The Effect of Information Provision on Stated and Revealed Preferences: A Field Experiment on the Choice of Power Tariffs Before and After Japanese Retail Electricity Liberalization," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 82(3), pages 573-599, July.
    14. Tobias Berger & Frank Daumann, 2021. "Anchoring bias in the evaluation of basketball players: A closer look at NBA draft decision‐making," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 42(5), pages 1248-1262, July.
    15. Barron, Kai, 2019. "Belief updating: Does the 'good-news, bad-news' asymmetry extend to purely financial domains?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2016-309r, WZB Berlin Social Science Center, revised 2019.
    16. Coutts, Alexander, 2015. "Testing Models of Belief Bias: An Experiment," MPRA Paper 67507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Gary Charness & Aldo Rustichini & Jeroen van de Ven, 2013. "Self-Confidence and Strategic Behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 4517, CESifo.
    18. Adrián Caballero & Raúl López-Pérez, 2020. "An experimental test of some economic theories of optimism," Working Papers 2006, Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos (IPP), CSIC.
    19. Pedro Gonzalez-Fernandez, 2024. "Belief Bias Identification," Papers 2404.09297, arXiv.org.
    20. Haitham A. Al‐Zoubi & Jennifer A. O'Sullivan & Aktham I. Al‐Maghyereh & Brendan J. Lambe, 2023. "Disentangling Sentiment from Cyclicality in Firm Capital Structure," Abacus, Accounting Foundation, University of Sydney, vol. 59(2), pages 570-605, June.
    21. Christian Schumacher & Steffen Keck & Wenjie Tang, 2020. "Biased interpretation of performance feedback: The role of CEO overconfidence," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(6), pages 1139-1165, June.

  4. Ashley C. Craig & Ellen Garbarino & Stephanie A. Heger & Robert Slonim, 2017. "Waiting To Give: Stated and Revealed Preferences," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 63(11), pages 3672-3690, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Briscese, Guglielmo & Lacetera, Nicola & Macis, Mario & Tonin, Mirco, 2023. "Expectations, reference points, and compliance with COVID-19 social distancing measures," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 103(C).
    2. Christine L. Exley & Stephen J. Terry, 2019. "Wage Elasticities in Working and Volunteering: The Role of Reference Points in a Laboratory Study," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 65(1), pages 413-425, January.
    3. Ismaël Rafaï & Thierry Blayac & Dimitri Dubois & Sebastien Duchene & Phu Nguyen-Van & Bruno Ventelou & Marc Willinger, 2023. "Stated preferences outperform elicited preferences for predicting reported compliance with Covid-19 prophylactic measures," Working Papers hal-04219784, HAL.
    4. Nagurney, Anna & Dutta, Pritha, 2019. "Competition for blood donations," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 103-114.
    5. Dezsîo, Linda & Hajdu, Gergely & Tobol, Yossef, 2024. "Unexpected waiting corrupts," Research Papers 26, EcoAustria – Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Haylock, Michael & Kampkötter, Patrick & Macis, Mario & Sauter, Jürgen & Seitz, Susanne & Slonim, Robert & Wiesen, Daniel & Schmidt, Alexander H., 2022. "Improving the Availability of Unrelated Stem Cell Donors: Evidence from a Major Donor Registry," IZA Discussion Papers 15096, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Linda Dezso & Gergely Hajdu & Yossef Tobol, 2024. "Unexpected Waiting Corrupts," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp358, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    8. Hajdu, Gergely & Dezső, Linda & Tobol, Yossef, 2024. "Unexpected Waiting Corrupts," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 358, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    9. Anna Nagurney & Pritha Dutta, 2021. "A Multiclass, Multiproduct Covid-19 Convalescent Plasma Donor Equilibrium Model," SN Operations Research Forum, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 1-30, September.
    10. Josefa D. Martín-Santana & Lucía Melián-Alzola, 2022. "The influence of service quality and anticipated emotions on donor loyalty: an empirical analysis in blood centres in Spain," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 623-648, December.
    11. Lucía Melián-Alzola & Josefa D. Martín-Santana, 2020. "Service quality in blood donation: satisfaction, trust and loyalty," Service Business, Springer;Pan-Pacific Business Association, vol. 14(1), pages 101-129, March.
    12. Robaina-Calderín, Lorena & Martín-Santana, Josefa D. & Melián-Alzola, Lucía, 2023. "Prosocial customer in the public sector: A PLS-SEM analysis applied to blood donation (active donors)," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2018-10-01
  2. NEP-SOC: Social Norms and Social Capital (1) 2014-11-28
  3. NEP-UPT: Utility Models and Prospect Theory (1) 2018-10-01

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