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Stephanie von Hinke

Personal Details

First Name:Stephanie
Middle Name:
Last Name:von Hinke
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvo110
Terminal Degree:2009 School of Economics, Finance and Management; University of Bristol (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) School of Economics, Finance and Management
University of Bristol

Bristol, United Kingdom
http://www.efm.bris.ac.uk/

: 0117 928 8415
0117 928 8577
Priory Road Complex, Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU
RePEc:edi:debriuk (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO)
School of Economics, Finance and Management
University of Bristol

Bristol, United Kingdom
http://www.bris.ac.uk/cmpo/

: 0117 33 10799
0117 33 10705
2 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX
RePEc:edi:cmbriuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Stephanie von Hinke & George Leckie, 2017. "Protecting Calorie Intakes against Income Shocks," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 17/684, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  2. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & von Hinke, Stephanie & Lindeboom, Maarten & Lissdaniels, Johannes & Sundquist, Jan & Sundquist, Kristina, 2017. "Mortality and the Business Cycle: Evidence from Individual and Aggregated Data," Working Papers 2017:5, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  3. Griffith, R. & von Hinke, S. & Smith, S., 2015. "Getting a healthy start: The effectiveness of targeted benefits for improving dietary choices," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/10, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  4. Rachel Griffith & Sarah Smith & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2014. "Getting a healthy start? Nudge versus economic incentives," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/328, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  5. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George L. Wehby & Sarah Lewis & Luisa Zuccolo, 2014. "Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement," NBER Working Papers 19839, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Cawley, J. & Von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S., 2013. "The Demand for Cigarettes as Derived from the Demand for Weight Control," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  7. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2013. "The London Bombings and Racial Prejudice: Evidence from Housing and Labour Markets," Working Papers 2013013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  8. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2011. "School meal crowd out in the 1980s," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/261, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  9. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/274, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  10. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2010. "Child height, health and human capital: evidence using genetic markers," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/245, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  11. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2010. "Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables:An Application to Child Fat Mass and Academic Achievement," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/229, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  12. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Marisa Ratto & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & Emma Tominey, 2009. "Smarter Task Assignment or Greater Effort: the impact of incentives on team performance," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/215, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  13. Stephanie Von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2007. "Maternal Employment and Overweight Children: Does Timing Matter?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/12, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

Articles

  1. von Hinke, Stephanie & Leckie, George, 2017. "Protecting energy intakes against income shocks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 210-232.
  2. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & von Hinke, Stephanie & Lindeboom, Maarten & Lissdaniels, Johannes & Sundquist, Jan & Sundquist, Kristina, 2017. "Mortality and the business cycle: Evidence from individual and aggregated data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 61-70.
  3. von Hinke, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2016. "Genetic markers as instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 131-148.
  4. John Cawley & Davide Dragone & Stephanie Von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2016. "The Demand for Cigarettes as Derived from the Demand for Weight Loss: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 8-23, January.
  5. Padraig Dixon & George Davey Smith & Stephanie von Hinke & Neil M. Davies & William Hollingworth, 2016. "Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(11), pages 1075-1086, November.
  6. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2015. "The London Bombings And Racial Prejudice: Evidence From The Housing And Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 276-293, January.
  7. Stephanie Hinke Kessler Scholder & George L. Wehby & Sarah Lewis & Luisa Zuccolo, 2014. "Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(576), pages 634-667, May.
  8. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2013. "Child height, health and human capital: Evidence using genetic markers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-22.
  9. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie, 2013. "School meal crowd out in the 1980s," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 538-545.
  10. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2012. "The effect of fat mass on educational attainment: Examining the sensitivity to different identification strategies," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 405-418.
  11. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Mendelian randomization: the use of genes in instrumental variable analyses," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 893-896, August.
  12. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Marisa Ratto & StephanievonHinke KesslerScholder & Emma Tominey, 2010. "Smarter Task Assignment or Greater Effort: The Impact of Incentives on Team Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(547), pages 968-989, September.
  13. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2008. "Maternal employment and overweight children: does timing matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(8), pages 889-906.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/274, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Genes as Instrumental Variables
      by David Stern in Stochastic Trend on 2013-01-12 14:26:00
  2. von Hinke Kessler Scholder S, 2009. "Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables: An Application to Child Fat Mass and Academic Achievement," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/25, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The Effect of Child Weight on Academic Performance: Evidence using Genetic Markers
      by Kevin Denny in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2009-07-29 19:56:00

Working papers

  1. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George L. Wehby & Sarah Lewis & Luisa Zuccolo, 2014. "Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement," NBER Working Papers 19839, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Climent Quintana-Domeque & Nicola Barban & Elisabetta De Cao & Sonia Oreffice, 2016. "Assortative Mating on Education: A Genetic Assessment," Economics Series Working Papers 791, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Padraig Dixon & George Davey Smith & Stephanie von Hinke & Neil M. Davies & William Hollingworth, 2016. "Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(11), pages 1075-1086, November.
    3. Grönqvist, Erik & Norén, Anna & Sjögren, Anna & Svaleryd, Helena, 2017. "Auditing mothers: The effect of targeted alcohol prevention on infant Health and maternal behavior," Working Paper Series 2017:19, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    4. von Hinke, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2016. "Genetic markers as instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 131-148.
    5. Greve, Jane & Schultz-Nielsen, Marie Louise & Tekin, Erdal, 2017. "Fetal malnutrition and academic success: Evidence from Muslim immigrants in Denmark," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 20-35.
    6. Nicola Barban & Elisabetta De Cao & Sonia Oreffice & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2016. "Assortative Mating: A Genetic Assessment," Working Papers 2016-034, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    7. Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser & Adi Shany, 2016. "Out of Africa: Human Capital Consequences of In Utero Conditions," NBER Working Papers 21894, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Cawley, J. & Von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S., 2013. "The Demand for Cigarettes as Derived from the Demand for Weight Control," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Amin, Vikesh & Lhila, Aparna, 2016. "Decomposing racial differences in adolescent smoking in the U.S," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 161-176.
    2. Choi, Hye Jeong & Yu, Mansoo & Sacco, Paul, 2018. "Racial and ethnic differences in patterns of adolescent tobacco users: A latent class analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 86-93.
    3. Dragone, D. & Ziebarth, N.R., 2015. "Non-Separable Time Preferences and Novelty Consumption: Theory and Evidence from the East German Transition to Capitalism," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/28, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Davide, Dragone & Francesco, Manaresi & Luca, Savorelli, 2013. "Obesity and smoking: can we catch two birds with one tax?," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-31, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    5. Jiti Gao & Bin Peng & Zhao Ren & Xiaohui Zhang, 2015. "Variable Selection for a Categorical Varying-Coefficient Model with Identifications for Determinants of Body Mass Index," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 21/15, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.

  3. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2011. "School meal crowd out in the 1980s," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/261, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Holford, Angus, 2014. "The labour supply effect of Education Maintenance Allowance and its implications for parental altruism," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-37, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

  4. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/274, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve & Nicholas A. Christakis & James H. Fowler & Bruno S. Frey, 2010. "Genes, Economics, and Happiness," CREMA Working Paper Series 2010-24, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    2. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S. & Wehby, G. L. & Lewis, S. & Zuccolo, L., 2014. "Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Windmeijer, F.; Farbmacher, H.; Davies, N.; Davey Smith, G.;, 2017. "On the Use of the Lasso for Instrumental Variables Estimation with Some Invalid Instruments," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Padraig Dixon & George Davey Smith & Stephanie von Hinke & Neil M. Davies & William Hollingworth, 2016. "Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(11), pages 1075-1086, November.
    5. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S & Davey Smith, G & Lawlor, DA & Propper, C & Windmeijer, F, 2013. "Child height, health and human capital: evidence using genetic markers," Working Papers 5947, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.
    6. Hafner, Lucas & Tauchmann, Harald & Wübker, Ansgar, 2017. "Does moderate weight loss affect subjective health perception in obese individuals? Evidence from field experimental data," Ruhr Economic Papers 730, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    7. Biørn, Erik, 2017. "Identification, Instruments, Omitted Variables, and Rudimentary Models: Fallacies in the ‘Experimental Approach’ to Econometrics," Memorandum 13/2017, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    8. Hafner, Lucas & Tauchmann, Harald & Wübker, Ansgar, 2017. "Does moderate weight loss affect subjective health perception in obese individuals? Evidence from field experimental data," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 26/2017, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    9. Böckerman, Petri & Viinikainen, Jutta & Vainiomäki, Jari & Hintsanen, Mirka & Pitkänen, Niina & Lehtimäki, Terho & Pehkonen, Jaakko & Rovio, Suvi & Raitakari, Olli, 2017. "Stature and long-term labor market outcomes: Evidence using Mendelian randomization," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 18-29.
    10. Michael W. L. Elsby & Ryan Michaels & David Ratner, 2015. "The Beveridge Curve: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 571-630, September.

  5. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2010. "Child height, health and human capital: evidence using genetic markers," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/245, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S. & Wehby, G. L. & Lewis, S. & Zuccolo, L., 2014. "Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Padraig Dixon & George Davey Smith & Stephanie von Hinke & Neil M. Davies & William Hollingworth, 2016. "Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(11), pages 1075-1086, November.
    3. Guven, Cahit & Lee, Wang-Sheng, 2015. "Height, aging and cognitive abilities across Europe," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 16-29.
    4. Dawid Philip & Didelez Vanessa, 2012. ""Imagine a Can Opener"--The Magic of Principal Stratum Analysis," The International Journal of Biostatistics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-12, July.
    5. Simon Lange & Marten von Werder, 2016. "Tracking and the Intergenerational Transmission of Education: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 880, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Fang, Muriel Zheng, 2014. "Violating the Monotonicity condition for instrumental variable—Dimorphic patterns of gene–behavior association," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 59-63.
    7. von Hinke, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2016. "Genetic markers as instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 131-148.
    8. Ludwig, Markus, 2013. "Youth Bulge and Mid-Life Moderation: Large Cohort Size Effects, Economic Perspectives and Civil Conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 53088, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2012. "The effect of fat mass on educational attainment: Examining the sensitivity to different identification strategies," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 405-418.
    10. Böckerman, Petri & Viinikainen, Jutta & Vainiomäki, Jari & Hintsanen, Mirka & Pitkänen, Niina & Lehtimäki, Terho & Pehkonen, Jaakko & Rovio, Suvi & Raitakari, Olli, 2017. "Stature and long-term labor market outcomes: Evidence using Mendelian randomization," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 18-29.
    11. Lee, Wang-Sheng, 2014. "Big and Tall: Is there a Height Premium or Obesity Penalty in the Labor Market?," IZA Discussion Papers 8606, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  6. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2010. "Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables:An Application to Child Fat Mass and Academic Achievement," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/229, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve & Nicholas A. Christakis & James H. Fowler & Bruno S. Frey, 2010. "Genes, Economics, and Happiness," CREMA Working Paper Series 2010-24, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    2. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Viinikainen, Jutta & Hakulinen, Christian & Pulkki-Raback, Laura & Raitakari, Olli, 2014. "Biomarkers and Long-term Labour Market Outcomes: The Case of Creatine," IZA Discussion Papers 8029, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Joseph Sabia & Daniel Rees, 2015. "Body weight, mental health capital, and academic achievement," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 653-684, September.
    4. Dawid Philip & Didelez Vanessa, 2012. ""Imagine a Can Opener"--The Magic of Principal Stratum Analysis," The International Journal of Biostatistics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-12, July.
    5. Petri Bockerman & Alex Bryson & Christian Hakulinen & Jaakko Pehkonen & Laura Pulkki-Raback & Olli Raitakari & Jutta Viinikainen, 2014. "Biomarkers and Long-term Market Outcomes: The Case of Creatine," CEP Discussion Papers dp1279, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2011. "Estimating the relation between health and education: What do we know and what do we need to know?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 778-791, October.

  7. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Marisa Ratto & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & Emma Tominey, 2009. "Smarter Task Assignment or Greater Effort: the impact of incentives on team performance," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/215, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Marisa Ratto & Emma Tominey, 2011. "Incentives in the Public Sector: Evidence from a Government Agency," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/265, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Nicholas Bloom & John Van Reenen, 2010. "Human Resource Management and Productivity," NBER Working Papers 16019, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Friebel, Guido & Heinz, Matthias & Krüger, Miriam & Zubanov, Nick, 2015. "Team Incentives and Performance: Evidence from a Retail Chain," IZA Discussion Papers 9316, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Broszeit, Sandra & Fritsch, Ursula & Görg, Holger & Laible, Marie-Christine, 2016. "Management Practices and Productivity in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 10370, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Frederico Finan & Benjamin A. Olken & Rohini Pande, 2015. "The Personnel Economics of the State," NBER Working Papers 21825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Hartmut Egger & Michael Koch, 2013. "Trade and the Firm-Internal Allocation of Workers to Tasks," Working Papers 139, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    7. Simon M. Burgess & Carol Propper & Marisa Ratto & Emma Tominey, 2017. "Incentives in the Public Sector: Evidence from a Government Agency," Post-Print hal-01651132, HAL.
    8. Broszeit, Sandra & Fritsch, Ursula & Görg, Holger & Laible, Marie-Christine, 2016. "Management practices and productivity in Germany (Managementpraktiken und Produktivität in Deutschland)," IAB Discussion Paper 201632, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    9. David J. Deming, 2015. "The Growing Importance of Social Skills in the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 21473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ana-Maria Godeanu, 2012. "The antecedents of satisfaction with pay in teams: do performance-based compensation and autonomy keep team-members satisfied?," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 3, pages 145-168, June.
    11. Fichera, Eleonora & Banks, James & Siciliani, Luigi & Sutton, Matt, 2017. "Does Patient Health Behaviour respond to Doctor’s Effort?," Department of Economics Working Papers 58124, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
    12. Josse (J.) Delfgaauw & Robert (A.J.) Dur & Michiel Souverijn, 2017. "Team Incentives, Task Assignment, and Performance: A Field Experiment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-090/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Hasnain, Zahid & Manning, Nick & Pierskalla Henryk, 2012. "Performance-related pay in the public sector : a review of theory and evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6043, The World Bank.
    14. Gall, Thomas & Hu, Xiaocheng & Vlassopoulos, Michael, 2016. "Dynamic Incentive Effects of Team Formation: Experimental Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 10393, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Broszeit, Sandra & Fritsch, Ursula & Görg, Holger & Laible, Marie-Christine, 2016. "Management practices and productivity in Germany," Kiel Working Papers 2050, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

  8. Stephanie Von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2007. "Maternal Employment and Overweight Children: Does Timing Matter?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/12, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Miller, 2011. "Maternal Work and Child Overweight and Obesity: The Importance of Timing," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 204-218, June.
    2. Price, Joseph & Swigert, Jeffrey, 2012. "Within-family variation in obesity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 333-339.
    3. Meyer, Sophie-Charlotte, 2016. "Maternal employment and childhood overweight in Germany," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 84-102.
    4. Zafar Nazarov & Michael S. Rendall, 2011. "Differences by Mother's Education in the Effect of Childcare on Child Obesity," Working Papers WR-890, RAND Corporation.
    5. John Cawley & Feng Liu, 2007. "Maternal Employment and Childhood Obesity: A Search for Mechanisms in Time Use Data," NBER Working Papers 13600, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Thérèse McDonnell & Orla Doyle, 2014. "Maternal Employment, Childcare and Childhood Overweight during Infancy," Working Papers 201416, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    7. Joan Costa Font & Mireia Jofre-Bonet & Julian Le Grand, 2015. "Vertical Transmission of Overweight: Evidence From English Adoptees," CEP Discussion Papers dp1324, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Lauber, Verena & Thomas, Lampert, 2014. "The Effect of Early Universal Daycare on Child Weight Problems," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100399, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Sophie-Charlotte Meyer, 2015. "Maternal Employment and Childhood Overweight in Germany," Schumpeter Discussion Papers SDP15005, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    10. Gwozdz, Wencke & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Reisch, Lucia A. & Ahrens, Wolfgang & De Henauw, Stefaan & Eiben, Gabriele & Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M. & Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos & Kovacs, Eva & Lauria, Fabio, 2013. "Maternal employment and childhood obesity: A European perspective," FZID Discussion Papers 73-2013, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
    11. Wencke Gwozdz, 2016. "Is maternal employment related to childhood obesity?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 267-267, June.
    12. Nie, Peng & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2014. "Maternal Employment and Childhood Obesity in China: Evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 8030, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Datar, Ashlesha & Nicosia, Nancy & Shier, Victoria, 2014. "Maternal work and children's diet, activity, and obesity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 196-204.
    14. Costa-Font, J. & Jofre-Bonet, M. & Le Grand, J., 2016. "Vertical Transmission of Overweight: Evidence from English Adoptees," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/05, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. Florence Jusot & Sandy Tubeuf & Alain Trannoy, 2017. "Effort or Circumstances: Does the Correlation Matter for Inequality of Opportunity in Health?," Working Papers hal-01619887, HAL.
    16. Jens Bonke & Jane Greve, 2012. "Children’s health-related life-styles: how parental child care affects them," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 557-572, December.
    17. Costa-Font, Joan & Gil, Joan, 2013. "Intergenerational and socioeconomic gradients of child obesity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 29-37.
    18. Greve, Jane, 2011. "New results on the effect of maternal work hours on children's overweight status: Does the quality of child care matter?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 579-590, October.
    19. Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M. & Dunifon, Rachel E. & Kalil, Ariel, 2013. "Parental employment and children's body weight: Mothers, others, and mechanisms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 52-59.

Articles

  1. von Hinke, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2016. "Genetic markers as instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 131-148.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. John Cawley & Davide Dragone & Stephanie Von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2016. "The Demand for Cigarettes as Derived from the Demand for Weight Loss: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 8-23, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Dragone, D. & Ziebarth, N.R., 2015. "Non-Separable Time Preferences and Novelty Consumption: Theory and Evidence from the East German Transition to Capitalism," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/28, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Dragone, Davide & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2017. "Non-separable time preferences, novelty consumption and body weight: Theory and evidence from the East German transition to capitalism," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 41-65.

  3. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2015. "The London Bombings And Racial Prejudice: Evidence From The Housing And Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 276-293, January.

    Cited by:

    1. van Duijn, Mark & Rouwendal, Jan & Boersema, Richard, 2016. "Redevelopment of industrial heritage: Insights into external effects on house prices," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 91-107.
    2. Adam Nowak & Juan Sayago-Gomez, 2017. "Homeowner Preferences after September 11th, a Microdata Approach," Working Papers 17-03, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    3. Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

  4. Stephanie Hinke Kessler Scholder & George L. Wehby & Sarah Lewis & Luisa Zuccolo, 2014. "Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(576), pages 634-667, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2013. "Child height, health and human capital: Evidence using genetic markers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-22.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie, 2013. "School meal crowd out in the 1980s," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 538-545.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2012. "The effect of fat mass on educational attainment: Examining the sensitivity to different identification strategies," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 405-418.

    Cited by:

    1. Climent Quintana-Domeque & Nicola Barban & Elisabetta De Cao & Sonia Oreffice, 2016. "Assortative Mating on Education: A Genetic Assessment," Economics Series Working Papers 791, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Donal O’Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2013. "The consequences of measurement error when estimating the impact of obesity on income," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-20, December.
    3. Fang, Muriel Zheng, 2014. "Violating the Monotonicity condition for instrumental variable—Dimorphic patterns of gene–behavior association," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 59-63.
    4. von Hinke, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2016. "Genetic markers as instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 131-148.
    5. Cawley, John, 2015. "An economy of scales: A selective review of obesity's economic causes, consequences, and solutions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 244-268.
    6. Dolton, Peter & Xiao, Mimi, 2017. "The intergenerational transmission of body mass index across countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 140-152.
    7. Kooreman, Peter & Scherpenzeel, Annette, 2014. "High frequency body mass measurement, feedback, and health behaviors," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 141-153.
    8. Nicola Barban & Elisabetta De Cao & Sonia Oreffice & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2016. "Assortative Mating: A Genetic Assessment," Working Papers 2016-034, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    9. Jonas Minet Kinge, 2017. "Waist circumference, body mass index, and employment outcomes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(6), pages 787-799, July.
    10. Dolton, Peter & Xiao, Mimi, 2015. "The intergenerational transmission of BMI in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 90-113.

  8. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Mendelian randomization: the use of genes in instrumental variable analyses," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 893-896, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Climent Quintana-Domeque & Nicola Barban & Elisabetta De Cao & Sonia Oreffice, 2016. "Assortative Mating on Education: A Genetic Assessment," Economics Series Working Papers 791, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Padraig Dixon & George Davey Smith & Stephanie von Hinke & Neil M. Davies & William Hollingworth, 2016. "Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(11), pages 1075-1086, November.
    3. Wehby, George L. & Murray, Jeffrey C. & Wilcox, Allen & Lie, Rolv T., 2012. "Smoking and body weight: Evidence using genetic instruments," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 113-126.
    4. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S & Davey Smith, G & Lawlor, DA & Propper, C & Windmeijer, F, 2013. "Child height, health and human capital: evidence using genetic markers," Working Papers 5947, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.
    5. von Hinke, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2016. "Genetic markers as instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 131-148.
    6. George Wehby & Allen Wilcox & Rolv Lie, 2013. "The impact of cigarette quitting during pregnancy on other prenatal health behaviors," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 211-233, June.
    7. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, Stephanie & Davey Smith, George & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Propper, Carol & Windmeijer, Frank, 2012. "The effect of fat mass on educational attainment: Examining the sensitivity to different identification strategies," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 405-418.
    8. Nicola Barban & Elisabetta De Cao & Sonia Oreffice & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2016. "Assortative Mating: A Genetic Assessment," Working Papers 2016-034, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

  9. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Marisa Ratto & StephanievonHinke KesslerScholder & Emma Tominey, 2010. "Smarter Task Assignment or Greater Effort: The Impact of Incentives on Team Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(547), pages 968-989, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  10. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2008. "Maternal employment and overweight children: does timing matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(8), pages 889-906.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 16 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (11) 2007-10-27 2007-11-17 2009-07-28 2010-10-02 2013-03-02 2013-03-16 2015-10-04 2017-03-12 2017-06-11 2017-07-09 2018-03-12. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (5) 2007-10-27 2007-11-17 2009-04-25 2010-02-13 2010-10-02. Author is listed
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2004-04-11 2009-07-28 2010-02-13 2013-10-02
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (3) 2017-03-12 2017-06-11 2018-03-12
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2017-03-12 2017-06-11 2018-03-12
  6. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2009-07-28 2010-02-13
  7. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2010-02-13 2010-10-02
  8. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2017-07-09
  9. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2015-04-19
  10. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2004-04-11
  11. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2013-03-16
  12. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-10-02
  13. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2004-04-11
  14. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2010-10-02
  15. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2010-10-02
  16. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2004-04-11

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