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Nan Tian

Personal Details

First Name:Nan
Middle Name:
Last Name:Tian
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pti135

Affiliation

(50%) Development Policy Research Unit
School of Economics
Faculty of Commerce
University of Cape Town

Cape Town, South Africa
http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/

: +27 21 650 5705
+27 21 650 5711
Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7701
RePEc:edi:dpuctza (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) School of Economics
Faculty of Commerce
University of Cape Town

Cape Town, South Africa
http://www.commerce.uct.ac.za/economics/

: (21) 650-2723
(21) 650-2854
Private Bag, Rondebosch 7701
RePEc:edi:seuctza (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. J Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2013. "Military Expenditure, Economic Growth and Heterogeneity," SALDRU Working Papers 095, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

Articles

  1. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2015. "Military Expenditure, Economic Growth and Heterogeneity," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 15-31, February.
  2. Dunne J. Paul & Tian Nan, 2014. "Conflict Spillovers and Growth in Africa," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(4), pages 1-11, December.
  3. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2013. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A survey," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 5-11, April.
  4. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2013. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A survey," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 5-11, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. J Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2013. "Military Expenditure, Economic Growth and Heterogeneity," SALDRU Working Papers 095, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Musayev, Vusal, 2013. "Military Spending and Growth: An Empirical Exploration of Contingent Relationships," MPRA Paper 59783, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ryan A. Compton & Bryan Paterson, 2016. "Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Institutions," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 301-322, June.
    3. Ünal Töngür & Adem Yavuz Elveren, 2017. "The nexus of economic growth, military expenditures, and income inequality," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 1821-1842, July.
    4. Manamperi, Nimantha, 2016. "Does military expenditure hinder economic growth? Evidence from Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1171-1193.
    5. Musayev, Vusal, 2013. "Externalities in Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Natural Resources as a Channel through Conflict," MPRA Paper 59784, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Expenditure and Investment in OECD Countries: Revisited," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(4), pages 1-10, December.
    7. Caruso, Raul, 2014. "Beyond Deterrence and Decline. Towards a General Understanding of Peace Economics," MPRA Paper 59505, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in An Augmented Solow Model: A Panel Data Investigation for OECD Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-15, August.
    9. Julien Malizard, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth in the European Union: Evidence from SIPRI’s extended dataset," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 38-44, October.
    10. Cosimo Magazzino & Lorenzo Giolli & Marco Mele, 2015. "Wagner’s Law and Peacock and Wiseman’s Displacement Effect in European Union Countries: A Panel Data Study," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(3), pages 812-819.
    11. Duncan Thomas K. & Coyne Christopher J., 2015. "The Revolving Door and the Entrenchment of the Permanent War Economy," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(3), pages 391-413, August.
    12. Phiri, Andrew, 2016. "Does military spending nonlinearly affect economic growth in South Africa?," MPRA Paper 69730, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Eftychia Nikolaidou, 2016. "Greece, Portugal, Spain: New evidence on the economic effects of military expenditure using the new SIPRI data," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 20-27, October.
    14. Uk Heo & Min Ye, 2016. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth around the Globe: The Direct and Indirect Link," International Interactions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 774-796, October.
    15. Bo Kyeong Lee & So Young Sohn, 2017. "Exploring the effect of dual use on the value of military technology patents based on the renewal decision," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 112(3), pages 1203-1227, September.
    16. Christopher Coyne, 2015. "Lobotomizing the defense brain," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 371-396, December.
    17. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Tsangyao Chang & Wen-Yi Chen & Feng-Li Lin & Rangan Gupta, 2015. "Asymmetric Granger Causality between Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Top Six Defense Suppliers," Working Papers 201565, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    18. Nusrate Aziz & M. Niaz Asadullah, 2017. "Military spending, armed conflict and economic growth in developing countries in the post-Cold War era," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(1), pages 47-68, January.
    19. Fiaz Hussain & Shahzad Hussain & Naila Erum, 2015. "Are Defense Expenditures Pro Poor or Anti Poor in Pakistan? An Empirical Investigation," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 54(4), pages 875-894.
    20. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth, 1960–2014," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 50-56, October.
    21. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2016. "Investment, growth, and defense expenditure in the EU15: Revisiting the nexus using SIPRI’s new consistent dataset," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 28-37, October.
    22. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Panayiotis Tzeremes & Nickolaos Tzeremes, 2017. "Defence expenditure and economic growth in Latin American countries: evidence from linear and nonlinear causality tests," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 26(1), pages 1-25, December.
    23. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Andreas Stergiou, 2016. "Military expenditure in Greece: Security challenges and economic constraints," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 28-34, April.
    24. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2016. "Corruption and growth in Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 71-88.
    25. Suna Korkmaz, 2015. "The Effect of Military Spending on Economic Growth and Unemployment in Mediterranean Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 273-280.

Articles

  1. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2015. "Military Expenditure, Economic Growth and Heterogeneity," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 15-31, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Dunne J. Paul & Tian Nan, 2014. "Conflict Spillovers and Growth in Africa," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(4), pages 1-11, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Fabrizio Carmignani & Parvinder Kler, 2013. "Surrounded by wars: Quantifying the role of spatial conflict spillovers," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201303, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    2. Dunne J. Paul & Tian Nan, 2017. "Working Paper 274 - Conflict and Fragile States in Africa," Working Paper Series 2391, African Development Bank.

  3. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2013. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A survey," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 5-11, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Ryan A. Compton & Bryan Paterson, 2016. "Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Institutions," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 301-322, June.
    2. Caruso, Raul, 2014. "Beyond Deterrence and Decline. Towards a General Understanding of Peace Economics," MPRA Paper 59505, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Brauer Jurgen, 2017. "‘Of the Expence of Defence’: What Has Changed Since Adam Smith?," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 23(2), pages 1-14, April.
    4. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in An Augmented Solow Model: A Panel Data Investigation for OECD Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-15, August.
    5. Julien Malizard, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth in the European Union: Evidence from SIPRI’s extended dataset," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 38-44, October.
    6. Duncan Thomas K. & Coyne Christopher J., 2015. "The Revolving Door and the Entrenchment of the Permanent War Economy," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(3), pages 391-413, August.
    7. Eftychia Nikolaidou, 2016. "Greece, Portugal, Spain: New evidence on the economic effects of military expenditure using the new SIPRI data," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 20-27, October.
    8. Christopher Coyne, 2015. "Lobotomizing the defense brain," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 371-396, December.
    9. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Tsangyao Chang & Wen-Yi Chen & Feng-Li Lin & Rangan Gupta, 2015. "Asymmetric Granger Causality between Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Top Six Defense Suppliers," Working Papers 201565, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    10. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Dunne, John Paul & Pieroni, Luca, 2013. "Military Expenditure, Endogeneity and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 45640, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Giorgio d'Agostino & J Paul Dunne & Luca Pieroni, 2016. "How much does military spending affect growth? Causal estimates from the World's non-rich countries," SALDRU Working Papers 196, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    12. Unal Tongur & Sara Hsu & Adem Yavuz Elveren, 2013. "Military Expenditures and Political Regimes: An Analysis Using Global Data, 1963-2001," ERC Working Papers 1307, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jul 2013.
    13. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth, 1960–2014," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 50-56, October.
    14. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2016. "Investment, growth, and defense expenditure in the EU15: Revisiting the nexus using SIPRI’s new consistent dataset," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 28-37, October.
    15. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Panayiotis Tzeremes & Nickolaos Tzeremes, 2017. "Defence expenditure and economic growth in Latin American countries: evidence from linear and nonlinear causality tests," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 26(1), pages 1-25, December.
    16. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Andreas Stergiou, 2016. "Military expenditure in Greece: Security challenges and economic constraints," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 28-34, April.
    17. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2016. "Corruption and growth in Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 71-88.
    18. Töngür, Ünal & Elveren, Adem, 2013. "The Impact of Military Spending and Income Inequality on Economic Growth in Turkey, 1963-2008," EY International Congress on Economics I (EYC2013), October 24-25, 2013, Ankara, Turkey 251, Ekonomik Yaklasim Association.

  4. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2013. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A survey," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 5-11, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Ryan A. Compton & Bryan Paterson, 2016. "Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Institutions," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 301-322, June.
    2. Caruso, Raul, 2014. "Beyond Deterrence and Decline. Towards a General Understanding of Peace Economics," MPRA Paper 59505, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Brauer Jurgen, 2017. "‘Of the Expence of Defence’: What Has Changed Since Adam Smith?," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 23(2), pages 1-14, April.
    4. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in An Augmented Solow Model: A Panel Data Investigation for OECD Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-15, August.
    5. Julien Malizard, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth in the European Union: Evidence from SIPRI’s extended dataset," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 38-44, October.
    6. Duncan Thomas K. & Coyne Christopher J., 2015. "The Revolving Door and the Entrenchment of the Permanent War Economy," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(3), pages 391-413, August.
    7. Eftychia Nikolaidou, 2016. "Greece, Portugal, Spain: New evidence on the economic effects of military expenditure using the new SIPRI data," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 20-27, October.
    8. Christopher Coyne, 2015. "Lobotomizing the defense brain," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 371-396, December.
    9. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Tsangyao Chang & Wen-Yi Chen & Feng-Li Lin & Rangan Gupta, 2015. "Asymmetric Granger Causality between Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Top Six Defense Suppliers," Working Papers 201565, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    10. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Dunne, John Paul & Pieroni, Luca, 2013. "Military Expenditure, Endogeneity and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 45640, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Giorgio d'Agostino & J Paul Dunne & Luca Pieroni, 2016. "How much does military spending affect growth? Causal estimates from the World's non-rich countries," SALDRU Working Papers 196, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    12. Unal Tongur & Sara Hsu & Adem Yavuz Elveren, 2013. "Military Expenditures and Political Regimes: An Analysis Using Global Data, 1963-2001," ERC Working Papers 1307, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jul 2013.
    13. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth, 1960–2014," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 50-56, October.
    14. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2016. "Investment, growth, and defense expenditure in the EU15: Revisiting the nexus using SIPRI’s new consistent dataset," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 28-37, October.
    15. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Panayiotis Tzeremes & Nickolaos Tzeremes, 2017. "Defence expenditure and economic growth in Latin American countries: evidence from linear and nonlinear causality tests," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 26(1), pages 1-25, December.
    16. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Andreas Stergiou, 2016. "Military expenditure in Greece: Security challenges and economic constraints," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 28-34, April.
    17. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2016. "Corruption and growth in Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 71-88.
    18. Töngür, Ünal & Elveren, Adem, 2013. "The Impact of Military Spending and Income Inequality on Economic Growth in Turkey, 1963-2008," EY International Congress on Economics I (EYC2013), October 24-25, 2013, Ankara, Turkey 251, Ekonomik Yaklasim Association.

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