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Guns and butter? Military expenditure and health spending on the eve of the Arab Spring

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  • Adam Coutts
  • Adel Daoud
  • Ali Fakih
  • Walid Marrouch
  • Bernhard Reinsberg

Abstract

We examine the validity of the guns-versus-butter hypothesis in the pre-Arab Spring era. Using panel data from 1995 to 2011 – the eve of the Arab uprisings – we find no evidence that increased security needs as measured by the number of domestic terrorist attacks are complemented by increased military spending or more importantly ‘crowd out’ government expenditure on key public goods such as health care. This suggests that both expenditure decisions were determined by other considerations at the government level.

Suggested Citation

  • Adam Coutts & Adel Daoud & Ali Fakih & Walid Marrouch & Bernhard Reinsberg, 2019. "Guns and butter? Military expenditure and health spending on the eve of the Arab Spring," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 227-237, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:30:y:2019:i:2:p:227-237
    DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2018.1497372
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    Cited by:

    1. Adel Daoud & Anders Herlitz & SV Subramanian, 2020. "Combining distributive ethics and causal Inference to make trade-offs between austerity and population health," Papers 2007.15550, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2020.
    2. Adem Elveren & Valentine M. Moghadam, 2019. "The impact of militarization on gender inequality and female labor force participation," Working Papers 1307, Economic Research Forum, revised 21 Aug 2019.
    3. Paula Gómez-Trueba Santamaría & Alfredo Arahuetes García & Tomás Curto González, 2021. "A tale of five stories: Defence spending and economic growth in NATO´s countries," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(1), pages 1-22, January.

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