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Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Institutions

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  • Ryan A. Compton
  • Bryan Paterson

Abstract

Recent literature on whether military spending affects economic growth argues that the relationship may be a conditional one. We add to this literature by considering the role that ‘good institutions’ play in the effect of military spending on growth. Using data from a sample of over 100 countries from 1988 to 2010, our analysis suggests that the effect of military spending on growth is generally negative or zero at best, and this effect is mitigated in the presence of good economic and political institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryan A. Compton & Bryan Paterson, 2016. "Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Institutions," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 301-322, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:27:y:2016:i:3:p:301-322
    DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2015.1060022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Natalia Utrero-González & Jana Hromcová & Francisco J. Callado-Muñoz, 2019. "Defence Spending, Institutional Environment and Economic Growth: Case of NATO," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(5), pages 525-548, July.
    2. Andrew Phiri, 2019. "Does Military Spending Nonlinearly Affect Economic Growth in South Africa?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(4), pages 474-487, June.
    3. Khalid Zaman, 2019. "Does higher military spending affect business regulatory and growth specific measures? Evidence from the group of seven (G-7) countries," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(1), pages 323-348, April.
    4. Nusrate Aziz & M. Niaz Asadullah, 2017. "Military spending, armed conflict and economic growth in developing countries in the post-Cold War era," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(1), pages 47-68, January.
    5. Kyriakos Emmanouilidis & Christos Karpetis, 2020. "The Defense–Growth Nexus: A Review of Time Series Methods and Empirical Results," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 86-104, January.
    6. Yingying Xu & Hsu Ling Chang & Chi Wei Su & Adelina Dumitrescu, 2018. "Guns for Butter? Empirical Evidence from China," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(7), pages 809-820, November.
    7. Oana Ramona GLONT, 2018. "The Effect Of Defence Spending On Economic Development In Central Europe," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Romanian Foundation for Business Intelligence, Editorial Department, issue 16, pages 97-106, May.
    8. Shakoor Ahmed & Khorshed Alam & Afzalur Rashid & Jeff Gow, 2020. "Militarisation, Energy Consumption, CO2 Emissions and Economic Growth in Myanmar," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(6), pages 615-641, August.
    9. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2016. "Military expenditure and economic growth, 1960–2014," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 50-56, October.
    10. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2019. "Military spending, economic growth and investment: a disaggregated analysis by income group," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 56(3), pages 935-958, March.
    11. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou & Panayiotis Tzeremes & Nickolaos Tzeremes, 2017. "Defence expenditure and economic growth in Latin American countries: evidence from linear and nonlinear causality tests," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 26(1), pages 1-25, December.
    12. Michael A. Akume & Gylych Jelilov & Benedict Akanegbu, 2019. "The Impact of Military Spending on Economic Wellbeing in Nigeria," International Journal of Business, Economics and Management, Conscientia Beam, vol. 6(4), pages 186-200.
    13. Jun Ando, 2018. "Externality of Defense Expenditure in the United States: A New Analytical Technique to Overcome Multicollinearity," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(7), pages 794-808, November.

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