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Working Paper 274 - Conflict and Fragile States in Africa

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  • Dunne J. Paul
  • Tian Nan

Abstract

This paper considers the determinants of conflict in Africa. It revisits the greed–grievance debate to consider the specific regional context and changing nature of conflict in sub-Saharan Africa. This is a literature that has grown rapidly in economics and political science, but some recent developments in modeling and conceptualization are providing important new contributions. It proposes and uses modeling techniques that deal with the problem of excess zeros, revisits the definition of conflict, and improves upon some proxy measures. Understanding the nature of conflict in Africa is vital to designing post-conflict economic policies and interventions, to ensure policies can prevent conflict-affected states from returning to conflict or remaining fragile.

Suggested Citation

  • Dunne J. Paul & Tian Nan, 2017. "Working Paper 274 - Conflict and Fragile States in Africa," Working Paper Series 2391, African Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:adb:adbwps:2391
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    File URL: https://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Publications/WPS_No_274__Conflict_and_Fragile_States_in_Africa__.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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