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Democracy, globalization and ethnic violence

Author

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  • Bezemer, Dirk
  • Jong-A-Pin, Richard

Abstract

Do democratization and globalization processes combine to increase the incidence of violence in developing and emerging economies? The present paper examines this hypothesis by a study of internal violence in Sub-Sahara Africa with its recent democratization wave, the globalization process and the presence of advantaged ethnic minorities. Specifically, we examine if democratization and globalization lead to ethnic violence in the presence of ‘market-dominant’ minorities. We explore the theoretical underpinning of this scenario and empirically assess its implications employing panel fixed effects regressions over the period 1984–2003. We find support in a Sub-Saharan African sample but no evidence for a worldwide effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Bezemer, Dirk & Jong-A-Pin, Richard, 2013. "Democracy, globalization and ethnic violence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 108-125.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:41:y:2013:i:1:p:108-125
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jce.2012.06.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:40:y:2018:i:4:p:647-662 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Potrafke, Niklas, 2013. "Globalization and labor market institutions: International empirical evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 829-842.
    3. Carolyn Chisadza & Matthew Clance, 2018. "Conflict Heterogeneity in Africa," Working Papers 201852, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    4. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Stefan Witthuhn, 2014. "Demographic Transition and Political Stability: Does Corruption Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5133, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "The Evidence on Globalisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 509-552, March.
    6. Wu, Yan & Heerink, Nico, 2016. "Foreign direct investment, fiscal decentralization and land conflicts in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 92-107.
    7. Carolyn Chisadza & Manoel Bittencourt, 2016. "Globalisation and Conflict: Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 634, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    8. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2017. "The Globalization and Peace Nexus: Findings Using Two Composite Indices," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 871-885, April.
    9. Atif Awad & Ishak Youssof, 2016. "The impact of economic globalisation on unemployment: The Malaysian experience," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(7), pages 938-958, October.
    10. Lakshmi Iyer & Petia Topalova, 2014. "Poverty and Crime: Evidence from Rainfall and Trade Shocks in India," Harvard Business School Working Papers 14-067, Harvard Business School, revised Aug 2014.
    11. Niklas Potrafke, 2014. "The Evidence on Globalization," CESifo Working Paper Series 4708, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; Globalization; Democracy; Ethnic violence; Market-dominant minorities;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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