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Population and Civil War

Listed author(s):
  • Daron Acemoglu
  • Leopoldo Fergusson
  • Simon Johnson

Medical and public health innovations in the 1940s quickly resulted in significant health improvements around the world. Countries with initially higher mortality from infectious diseases experienced greater increases in life expectancy, population, and - over the following 40 years - social conflict. This result is robust across alternative measures of conflict and is not driven by differential trends between countries with varying baseline characteristics. At least during this time period, a faster increase in population made social conflict more likely, probably because it increased competition for scarce resources in low income countries.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w23322.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23322.

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Date of creation: Apr 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23322
Note: POL
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