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Politically Relevant Ethnic Groups across Space and Time: Introducing the GeoEPR Dataset1

Author

Listed:
  • Julian Wucherpfennig
  • Nils B. Weidmann
  • Luc Girardin
  • Lars-Erik Cederman
  • Andreas Wimmer

Abstract

This article introduces GeoEPR, a geocoded version of the Ethnic Power Relations (EPR) dataset that charts politically relevant ethnic groups across space and time. We describe the dataset in detail, discuss its advantages and limitations, and use it in a replication of Cederman, Wimmer and Min’s (2010) study on the causes of ethno-nationalist conflict. We show that territorial conflicts are more likely to involve groups that settle far away from the capital city and close to the border, while these spatial variables have no effect for governmental conflicts.

Suggested Citation

  • Julian Wucherpfennig & Nils B. Weidmann & Luc Girardin & Lars-Erik Cederman & Andreas Wimmer, 2011. "Politically Relevant Ethnic Groups across Space and Time: Introducing the GeoEPR Dataset1," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 28(5), pages 423-437, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:28:y:2011:i:5:p:423-437
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    Cited by:

    1. Ore Koren & Benjamin E. Bagozzi, 2016. "From global to local, food insecurity is associated with contemporary armed conflicts," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(5), pages 999-1010, October.
    2. Nemera Mamo & Sambit Bhattacharyya, 2018. "Natural Resources and Political Patronage in Africa: An Ethnicity Level Analysis," Working Paper Series 0418, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    3. Joan Esteban & Sabine Flamand & Massimo Morelli & Dominic Rohner, 2017. "The Survival and Demise of the State: A Dynamic Theory of Secession," Working Papers 609, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    4. Dunne J. Paul & Tian Nan, 2017. "Working Paper 274 - Conflict and Fragile States in Africa," Working Paper Series 2391, African Development Bank.
    5. repec:bpj:pepspp:v:18:y:2012:i:3:p:10:n:4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Gold Valentin, 2012. "Partitioning Ethnic Groups and their Members: Explaining Variations in Satisfaction with Democracy in Africa," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-10, December.
    7. Klaus Ackermann & Simon D Angus & Paul A Raschky, 2017. "The Internet as Quantitative Social Science Platform: Insights from a Trillion Observations," Papers 1701.05632, arXiv.org.
    8. Morelli, Massimo & Rohner, Dominic, 2015. "Resource concentration and civil wars," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 32-47.
    9. Omar Shahabudin McDoom & Rachel M. Gisselquist, 2016. "The Measurement of Ethnic and Religious Divisions: Spatial, Temporal, and Categorical Dimensions with Evidence from Mindanao, the Philippines," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(2), pages 863-891, November.
    10. McDoom Omar & Gisselquist Rachel M., 2015. "The Conceptualization and Measurement of Ethnic and Religious Divisions: Categorical, Temporal, and Spatial Dimensions with Evidence from Mindanao, the Philippines," WIDER Working Paper Series 022, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Andrea Guariso & Thorsten Rogall, 2017. "Rainfall Inequality, Political Power, and Ethnic Conflict in Africa," LICOS Discussion Papers 39117, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    12. Fjelde, Hanne, 2015. "Farming or Fighting? Agricultural Price Shocks and Civil War in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 525-534.

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