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Tectonic Boundaries and Strongholds: The Religious Geography of Violence in Northern Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Hannes Mueller
  • Dominic Rohner
  • David Schoenholzer

Abstract

The conflict in Northern Ireland was an example of "complex warfare" with both insurgency and sectarian violence. We present a unified model that helps to identify these two forms of conflict from the spatial distribution of violence. The model predicts that tectonic boundaries between residential areas of opposed groups drive sectarian violence. Violence between the minority and state forces takes place in minority strongholds. We test the model with fine-grained data on religious composition and geo-referenced data on killings with detailed information on attackers and targets. We also show that sectarian violence can predict the placement of barriers (i.e. so-called "peace lines"). Finally, we analyze the effect of a troop surge in 1972 and the proximity to the Republic of Ireland on the two elements of the conflict.

Suggested Citation

  • Hannes Mueller & Dominic Rohner & David Schoenholzer, 2013. "Tectonic Boundaries and Strongholds: The Religious Geography of Violence in Northern Ireland," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 13.04, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  • Handle: RePEc:lau:crdeep:13.04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Laia Balcells & Lesley-Ann Daniels & Abel Escribà-Folch, 2014. "The determinants of low-intensity intergroup violence. The case of Northern Ireland," HiCN Working Papers 190, Households in Conflict Network.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflict; Terrorism; Religious Tensions; Ethnic Diversity; Northern Ireland; Segregation; Insurgency; Counter-Terrorism;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • N44 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Europe: 1913-
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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