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‘Of the Expence of Defence’: What Has Changed Since Adam Smith?

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  • Brauer Jurgen

    () (Hull College of Business, Augusta University, Augusta, USA)

Abstract

This essay selectively reviews the history of economic thought on war and peace, starting with Adam Smith. Today, Smith’s trickle of thoughts has become a broad marshland. In this marshland, however, discrete currents are apparent – some stronger, some weaker – which this essay identifies, in rough chronological order, as war, defense, conflict, military, security, and peace economics. As these terms often are used interchangeably, one purpose of the essay is to more clearly delineate these intellectual currents and differentiate them from each other. By building canals in the marshlands as it were, the aim is to help all flows of contributions become stronger.

Suggested Citation

  • Brauer Jurgen, 2017. "‘Of the Expence of Defence’: What Has Changed Since Adam Smith?," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 23(2), pages 1-14, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:pepspp:v:23:y:2017:i:2:p:14:n:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    defense economics; conflict economics; military economics; security economics; peace economics;

    JEL classification:

    • B00 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General - - - History of Economic Thought, Methodology, and Heterodox Approaches
    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General
    • F50 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - General
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • K00 - Law and Economics - - General - - - General (including Data Sources and Description)
    • L64 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Other Machinery; Business Equipment; Armaments
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Q34 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Natural Resources and Domestic and International Conflicts

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