IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/ppo116.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Mark Pocock

Personal Details

First Name:Mark
Middle Name:
Last Name:Pocock
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppo116
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Office of the Comptroller of the Currency
Department of the Treasury
Government of the United States

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.occ.gov/

202-874-4700
202-622-6415
400 7th St. SW, Washington, DC 20219
RePEc:edi:occgvus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2006. "Time Zones as Cues for Coordination: Latitude, Longitude, and Letterman," NBER Working Papers 12350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Myers, Caitlin Knowles & Pocock, Mark L., 2006. "Cues for Coordination: Light, Longitude and Letterman," IZA Discussion Papers 2060, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2008. "Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 223-246, April.
  2. Jungmin Lee & Mark L. Pocock, 2007. "Intrahousehold allocation of financial resources: evidence from South Korean individual bank accounts," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 41-58, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2008. "Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 223-246, April.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Should we get rid of time zones?
      by Brad Plumer in Ezra Klein's Wonkblog on 2012-03-17 17:25:15

Working papers

  1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2006. "Time Zones as Cues for Coordination: Latitude, Longitude, and Letterman," NBER Working Papers 12350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2007. "Does Extending Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from an Australian Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 2704, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Almudena Sevilla Sanz & Jose Ignacio GImenez Nadal, 2007. "A Note on Leisure Inequality in the US: 1965-2003," Economics Series Working Papers 374, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    3. Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2008. "Daylight time and energy: Evidence from an Australian experiment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 207-220, November.
    4. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2008. "Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 223-246, April.
    5. Matthew J. Kotchen & Laura E. Grant, 2008. "Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana," NBER Working Papers 14429, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Myers, Caitlin Knowles & Pocock, Mark L., 2006. "Cues for Coordination: Light, Longitude and Letterman," IZA Discussion Papers 2060, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Jay Stewart, 2009. "The Timing of Maternal Work and Time with Children," Working Papers 425, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    2. Jay Stewart & Mary Dorinda Allard, 2008. "How Does Employment Affect the Timing of Time with Children?," Working Papers 419, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Articles

  1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2008. "Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 223-246, April.

    Cited by:

    1. German Cubas & Chinhui Juhn & Pedro Silos, 2020. "Coordinated Work Schedules and the Gender Wage Gap," DETU Working Papers 2002, Department of Economics, Temple University.
    2. Giuntella, Osea & Han, Wei & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2016. "Circadian Rhythms, Sleep and Cognitive Skills: Evidence from an Unsleeping Giant," IZA Discussion Papers 9774, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Jin, Lawrence & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2015. "Does Daylight Saving Time Really Make Us Sick?," IZA Discussion Papers 9088, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Yoram Weiss, 2009. "Work and Leisure: A History of Ideas," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 1-20, January.
    5. Ribar, David C., 2012. "Immigrants' Time Use: A Survey of Methods and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 6931, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Adler, David & Severnini, Edson R., 2020. "Timing Matters: Shifting Economic Activity and Intra-Day Variation in Ambient Ozone Concentrations," IZA Discussion Papers 13428, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Charles J. Courtemanche & Joshua C. Pinkston & Jay Stewart, 2020. "Time Spent Exercising and Obesity: An Application of Lewbel’s Instrumental Variables Method," NBER Working Papers 26670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Frazis, Harley & Stewart, Jay, 2010. "How to Think About Time-Use Data: What Inferences Can We Make About Long- and Short-Run Time Use from Time Diaries?," IZA Discussion Papers 5306, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Lozano, Fernando A., 2012. "What Happened to God's Time? The Evolution of Secularism and Hours of Work in America, Evidence from Religious Holidays," IZA Discussion Papers 6552, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Osea Giuntella & Fabrizio Mazzonna, 2015. "If You Don’t Snooze You Lose Health and Gain Weight Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," IdEP Economic Papers 1505, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    11. Labanca, Claudio & Pozzoli, Dario, 2018. "Coordination of Hours within the Firm," IZA Discussion Papers 12062, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Jin, Lawrence & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2020. "Sleep, health, and human capital: Evidence from daylight saving time," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 170(C), pages 174-192.
    13. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2019. "Sunset time and the economic effects of social jetlag: evidence from US time zone borders," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 210-226.
    14. Daniel Hamermesh, 2009. "It’s Time to “Do Economics” with Time-Use Data," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 65-68, August.
    15. Jin, L. & Ziebarth, N.R., 2015. "Sleep and Human Capital: Evidence from Daylight Saving Time," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/27, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    16. Costa-Font, Joan & Flèche, Sarah, 2018. "Child Sleep and Maternal Labour Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11755, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Lozano, Fernando A., 2009. "The Flexibility of the Workweek in the United States: Evidence from the FIFA World Cup," IZA Discussion Papers 4217, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Morikawa, Masayuki, 2012. "Demand fluctuations and productivity of service industries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 256-258.
    19. Katie R. Genadek & Sarah M. Flood & Joan Garcia Roman, 2016. "Trends in Spouses’ Shared Time in the United States, 1965–2012," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 1801-1820, December.
    20. Weinhardt, Felix, 2013. "The importance of time zone assignment: evidence from residential electricity consumption," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59253, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    21. Gibson, Matthew & Shrader, Jeffrey, 2014. "Time Use and Productivity: The Wage Returns to Sleep," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8zp518hc, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    22. Wolff, Hendrik & Makino, Momoe, 2012. "Extending Becker's Time Allocation Theory to Model Continuous Time Blocks: Evidence from Daylight Saving Time," IZA Discussion Papers 6787, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    23. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2016. "If You Don't Snooze You Lose: Evidence on Health and Weight," IZA Discussion Papers 9773, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    24. C Green & M Navarro Paniagua, 2010. "Does Raising the School Leaving Age Reduce Teacher Effort? A Note from a Policy Experiment," Working Papers 609674, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    25. Almudena Sevilla & Jose Gimenez-Nadal & Jonathan Gershuny, 2012. "Leisure Inequality in the United States: 1965–2003," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 939-964, August.
    26. Jorge González Chapela, 2018. "Physical Work Intensity and the Split Workday: Theory and Evidence from Spain," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 329-353, September.
    27. González Chapela, Jorge, 2014. "Split or straight? Some evidence on the effect of the work shift on Spanish workers' well-being and time use," MPRA Paper 57301, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    28. Jorge González Chapela, 2015. "Split or straight? Evidence of the effects of work schedules on workers’ well-being, time use, and productivity," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 153-177, June.

  2. Jungmin Lee & Mark L. Pocock, 2007. "Intrahousehold allocation of financial resources: evidence from South Korean individual bank accounts," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 41-58, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Alistair Munro, 2014. "Hide and Seek: A Theory of Efficient Income Hiding within the Household," GRIPS Discussion Papers 14-17, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    2. Shoshana Grossbard & Elena Stancanelli, 2010. "Whose time? Who saves? Introduction to a special issue on couples’ savings, time use and children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 289-296, September.
    3. Shoshana Amyra Grossbard & Alfredo Marvão Pereira, 2013. "Savings and Economies of Marriage: Intra-Marriage Financial Distributions as Determinants of Savings," Working Papers 95, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
    4. Shoshana Amyra Grossbard & Alfredo Marvao Pereira & Shoshana Grossbard, 2010. "Will Women Save more than Men? A Theoretical Model of Savings and Marriage," CESifo Working Paper Series 3146, CESifo.
    5. Edwin Wong, 2015. "Marital bargaining in the demand for life insurance: evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 243-268, June.
    6. San Vicente Portes, Luis & Atal, Vidya & Juárez Torres, Miriam, 2019. "From households to national statistics: Macroeconomic effects of Women's empowerment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 286-294.
    7. Sergii Maksymovych, 2017. "Decision-Making in the Household and Material Deprivation," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp604, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    8. Metzger, Christoph, 2016. "Intra-household allocation of non-mandatory retirement savings," FZG Discussion Papers 60, University of Freiburg, Research Center for Generational Contracts (FZG).
    9. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Bonke, Jens & Grossbard, Shoshana, 2010. "Income Pooling and Household Division of Labor: Evidence from Danish Couples," IZA Discussion Papers 5418, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Grabka, Markus M. & Marcus, Jan & Sierminska, Eva, 2013. "Wealth Distribution within Couples," IZA Discussion Papers 7637, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Katherine Grace Carman & Angela A. Hung, 2017. "Household Retirement Saving The Location of Savings Between Spouses," Working Papers WR-1166, RAND Corporation.
    12. Markus M. Grabka & Jan Marcus & Eva Sierminska, 2013. "Wealth Distribution within Couples and Financial Decision Making," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 540, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    13. Francis Tsiboe & Yacob A. Zereyesus & Jennie S. Popp & Evelyn Osei, 2018. "The Effect of Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture on Household Nutrition and Food Poverty in Northern Ghana," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 89-108, July.
    14. Tansel Yilmazer & Stephen Lich, 2015. "Portfolio choice and risk attitudes: a household bargaining approach," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 219-241, June.
    15. Sara Cantillon & Bertrand Maître & Dorothy Watson, 2016. "Family Financial Management and Individual Deprivation," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 461-473, September.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2006-04-22
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2006-04-22

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Mark Pocock should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.