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Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh
  • Caitlin Knowles Myers
  • Mark L. Pocock

Abstract

Daylight, television schedules, and time zones can alter timing and induce temporal coordination of economic activities. With the American Time Use Survey for 2003-2004 and data from Australia for 1992, we show that television schedules and the locations of time zones affect the timing of market work and sleep, with differences in timing being generated partly by returns to coordination with other agents. The responsiveness to time zone differences is greatest among workers in industries in national markets. An exogenous shock resulting from an area's nonadherence to daylight saving time leads its residents to alter work schedules to coordinate with people elsewhere. (c) 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2008. "Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 223-246, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:i:2:p:223-246
    DOI: 10.1086/525027
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    References listed on IDEAS

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