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Data Watch: The American Time Use Survey

Author

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh
  • Harley Frazis
  • Jay Stewart

Abstract

We discuss the new American Time Use Survey (ATUS), an on-going household survey of roughly 1,200 Americans per month (1,800 per month in the first year, 2003) that collects time diaries as well as demographic interview information from respondents who had recently been in the Current Population Survey. The characteristics of the data are presented, as are caveats and concerns that one might have about them. A number of novel uses of the ATUS in economic research, including in the areas of macroeconomics, national income accounting, labor economics, and others, are proposed to illustrate the magnitude of this new survey's possible applications.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh & Harley Frazis & Jay Stewart, 2005. "Data Watch: The American Time Use Survey," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 221-232, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:19:y:2005:i:1:p:221-232
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/0895330053148029
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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