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“Mondays at the sun”: Unemployment, Time Use, and Consumption Patterns in Spain

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  • Namkee Ahn,
  • Juan F. Jimeno
  • Arantza Ugidos

Abstract

This paper is a first step towards learning about the implications of unemployment with regard to the combination of consumption expenditures and time use within households under the theoretical base on Becker’s (1964) household production theory. We examine the Spanish experience, where the unemployment rate was above 15% since the early 1980s up to the late 1990s and, clearly, many unemployed workers were out of jobs involuntarily, hence forced to adjust their time and consumption allocation patterns accordingly. Our results, overall, seem consistent with the main prediction of the household production theory. What we found is that time intensive commodities (passive leisure, active leisure, housework and child care) are produced more in the households with unemployed individuals. We also find that (with the exception of single females) the proportion of consumption expenditures in time saving goods is lower in the households with unemployed individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Namkee Ahn, & Juan F. Jimeno & Arantza Ugidos, "undated". "“Mondays at the sun”: Unemployment, Time Use, and Consumption Patterns in Spain," Working Papers 2003-18, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2003-18
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    Cited by:

    1. Ateca-Amestoy, Victoria & Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael & Vera-Toscano, Esperanza, 2008. "The leisure experience," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 64-78, February.
    2. Burda, Michael C. & Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2010. "Unemployment, market work and household production," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 131-133, May.
    3. José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & José Alberto Molina & Raquel Ortega, 2010. "Unemployment and Time Use: Evidence from the Spanish Time Use Survey," Documentos de Trabajo dt2010-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    4. Gash, Vanessa & Mertens, Antje & Romeu Gordo, Laura, 2006. "Are fixed-term jobs bad for your health? A comparison between Western Germany and Spain," Working Papers 27, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute of Management Berlin (IMB).
    5. Gash, Vanessa & Mertens, Antje & Romeu Gordo, Laura, 2006. "Are fixed-term jobs bad for your health? : a comparison of West-Germany and Spain," IAB Discussion Paper 200608, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2014. "Regional unemployment, gender, and time allocation of the unemployed," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 105-127, March.
    7. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Harley Frazis & Jay Stewart, 2005. "Data Watch: The American Time Use Survey," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 221-232, Winter.
    8. Namkee Ahn & Juan Ramón García & Juan F. Jimeno, "undated". "Well-being Consequences of Unemployment in Europe," Working Papers 2004-11, FEDEA.
    9. José A. Herce, "undated". "Could this ever happen in Spain? Economic and policy aspects of a SARS-like episode," Working Papers 2004-09, FEDEA.
    10. Juan Prieto & Juan Gabriel Rodríguez & Rafael Salas, "undated". "Polarization, Inequality and Tax Reforms," Working Papers 2003-23, FEDEA.
    11. Bettina Sonnenberg & Michaela Riediger & Cornelia Wrzus & Gert G. Wagner, 2011. "Measuring Time Use in Surveys: How Valid Are Time Use Questions in Surveys? Concordance of Survey and Experience Sampling Measures," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 390, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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