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Time Vs. Goods: The Value of Measuring Household Production Technologies

  • Reuben Gronau
  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

We take U.S. and Israeli household data on expenditures of time and goods, generate an exhaustive set of commodities that households produce/consume using them, and calculate their relative goods intensities. Leisure activities are uniformly relatively time intensive, health, travel and lodging relatively goods intensive. We demonstrate how education and age alter the goods intensity of household production. The results of this accounting can be used as guides to: Understanding how goods and income taxation interact to affect welfare; expanding notions of the determinants of international flows of goods; generating models of business cycles and endogenous growth to include interactions of goods and time consumption; and obtaining better measures of the distribution of well being.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9650.

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Date of creation: Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as "Time vs. Goods: The Value of Measuring Household Production Technologies" Gronau, Reuben; Hamermesh, Daniel S.; Review of Income and Wealth, March 2006, v. 52, iss. 1, pp. 1-16
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9650
Note: LS
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  1. Biddle, Jeff E & Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1990. "Sleep and the Allocation of Time," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 922-43, October.
  2. Apps, Patricia & Rees, Ray, 2001. "Household production, full consumption and the costs of children," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(6), pages 621-648, December.
  3. Jess Benhabib & Richard Rogerson & Randall Wright, 1991. "Homework in macroeconomics: household production and aggregate fluctuations," Staff Report 135, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  4. Markusen, James R, 1986. "Explaining the Volume of Trade: An Eclectic Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1002-11, December.
  5. Landefeld, J Steven & McCulla, Stephanie H, 2000. "Accounting for Nonmarket Household Production within a National Accounts Framework," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(3), pages 289-307, September.
  6. Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2000. "Timing, Togetherness and Time Windfalls," IZA Discussion Papers 173, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Boskin, Michael J., 1975. "Efficiency aspects of the differential tax treatment of market and household economic activity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-25, February.
  8. Gronau, Reuben, 1987. "Home production -- A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 273-304 Elsevier.
  9. Robert A. Pollak, 2002. "Gary Becker's Contributions to Family and Household Economics," NBER Working Papers 9232, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Michael, Robert T, 1973. "Education in Nonmarket Production," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 306-27, Part I, M.
  11. Ortigueira, Salvador & Santos, Manuel S, 1997. "On the Speed of Convergence in Endogenous Growth Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 383-99, June.
  12. S├ębastien Lecocq, 2001. "The allocation of time and goods in household activities: A test of separability," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 585-597.
  13. Iulie Aslaksen & Trude Fagerli & Hanne Gravningsmyhr, 1996. "An estimation of time and commodity intensity in unpaid household production in Norway," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 81-91.
  14. Michael Abbott & Orley Ashenfelter, 1974. "Labor Supply, Commodity Demand, and the Allocation of Time," Working Papers 437, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
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