IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fda/fdaddt/2004-11.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Well-being Consequences of Unemployment in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Namkee Ahn
  • Juan Ramón García
  • Juan F. Jimeno

Abstract

Among the working age population, one of the most damaging individual experience is found to be unemployment. Many previous studies have confirmed devastating effects of unemployment on individual well-being, both pecuniary and non-pecuniary. Using the data from the European Community Household Panel survey we examine the factors which affect unemployed workers’ well- being (satisfaction) with respect to their situations in activity, income, housing, leisure time and health in Europe. Unemployment incidence reduces substantially the satisfaction levels with main activity and finance, while it increases substantially the satisfaction level with leisure time. With respect to health, it has a small negative effect. Unemployment duration, on the other hand, shows a small negative effect on individual well-being, suggesting that unemployment has lasting and aggravating effect over the spells, contradicting the theory of adaptation. Three other results are worth mentioning. First, there are large cross-country differences in the well-being consequences of unemployment. Much smaller effects of unemployment are observed in Denmark and the Netherlands than in other countries. A part of this difference seems to be due to the differences in functioning and regulations in the labor market. In Denmark and the Netherlands, unemployment rate is lower, whose spells are shorter, and unemployment protection (unemployment benefits and active labor market policies) is greater. Second, with respect to methodology, there are small differences between cross-section and panel estimates, suggesting small bias due to unobserved fixed effects in cross-section estimation. Finally, among the unemployed, non-pecuniary factors, such as job prospect, health, and social relation, show significant effects on individual well-being, along with household income.

Suggested Citation

  • Namkee Ahn & Juan Ramón García & Juan F. Jimeno, "undated". "Well-being Consequences of Unemployment in Europe," Working Papers 2004-11, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2004-11
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://documentos.fedea.net/pubs/dt/2004/dt-2004-11.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bentolila, Samuel & Ichino, Andrea, 2000. "Unemployment and Consumption: Are Job Losses Less Painful near the Mediterranean?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2539, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2005. "Healthy living in hard times," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 341-363, March.
    3. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2004. "Well-being over time in Britain and the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1359-1386, July.
    4. Stewart, Jennifer M., 2001. "The impact of health status on the duration of unemployment spells and the implications for studies of the impact of unemployment on health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 781-796, September.
    5. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-659, May.
    6. Andrew E. Clark & Ed Diener & Yannis Georgellis & Richard E. Lucas, 2008. "Lags And Leads in Life Satisfaction: a Test of the Baseline Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(529), pages 222-243, June.
    7. William A. Darity & Arthur H. Goldsmith, 1996. "Social Psychology, Unemployment and Macroeconomics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 121-140, Winter.
    8. Ruhm, Christopher J. & Black, William E., 2002. "Does drinking really decrease in bad times?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 659-678, July.
    9. Martin Browning & Thomas Crossley, "undated". "Shocks, stocks and socks: consumption smoothing and the replacement of durables during an unemployment spell," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 27, McMaster University.
    10. Martin Browning & Anne Møller Danø & Eskil Heinesen, 2003. "Job Displacement and Health Outcomes: A Representative Panel Study," CAM Working Papers 2003-14, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
    11. Winkelmann, Liliana & Winkelmann, Rainer, 1998. "Why Are the Unemployed So Unhappy? Evidence from Panel Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(257), pages 1-15, February.
    12. Namkee Ahn, & Juan F. Jimeno & Arantza Ugidos, "undated". "“Mondays at the sun”: Unemployment, Time Use, and Consumption Patterns in Spain," Working Papers 2003-18, FEDEA.
    13. Franco Peracchi, 2002. "The European Community Household Panel: A review," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 63-90.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Why not full employment?
      by chris in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2016-04-23 17:03:57

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Simon Sosvilla-Rivero & Pedro Rodriguez, 2010. "Linkages in international stock markets: evidence from a classification procedure," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(16), pages 2081-2089.
    2. Antonio Golpe & Andre van Stel, 2007. "Self-Employment and Unemployment in Spanish Regions in the Period 1979-2001," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-021, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    3. Labeaga, José M. & Molina, José Alberto & Navarro Paniagua, Maria, 2007. "Income Satisfaction and Deprivation in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 2702, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Verheul, Ingrid & Van Stel, André & Thurik , Roy & Urbano, David, 2006. "The Relationship between Business Ownership and Unemployment in Spain: A Matter of Quantity or Quality?/La relación entre el autoempleo y el desempleo en España: Una cuestión de cantidad o de calidad?," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 24, pages 435-457, Agosto.
    5. Pedersen, Peder J. & Schmidt, Torben Dall, 2011. "Happiness in Europe," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 480-489.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2004-11. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Carmen Arias). General contact details of provider: http://www.fedea.net .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.