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Daylight time and energy: Evidence from an Australian experiment

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  • Kellogg, Ryan
  • Wolff, Hendrik

Abstract

Several countries are considering using daylight saving time (DST) as a tool for energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and the United States extended DST in 2007 with the goal of reducing electricity consumption. This paper assesses DST's impact on electricity demand by examining a quasi-experiment in which parts of Australia extended DST in 2000 to facilitate the Sydney Olympics. Using detailed panel data and a difference-in-difference-in-difference framework, we show that the extension did not reduce overall electricity consumption, but did cause a substantial intraday shift in demand consistent with activity patterns that are tied to the clock rather than sunrise and sunset.

Suggested Citation

  • Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2008. "Daylight time and energy: Evidence from an Australian experiment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 207-220, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:56:y:2008:i:3:p:207-220
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lisa A. Kramer & Mark J. Kamstra & Maurice D. Levi, 2000. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1005-1011, September.
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    10. James B. Bushnell & Erin T. Mansur, 2005. "CONSUMPTION UNDER NOISY PRICE SIGNALS: A STUDY OF ELECTRICITY RETAIL RATE DEREGULATION IN SAN DIEGO -super-," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 493-513, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Felix Weinhardt, 2013. "The Importance of Time Zone Assignment: Evidence from Residential Electricity Consumption," SERC Discussion Papers serddp0126, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    2. Ahuja, Dilip R. & SenGupta, D.P., 2012. "Year-round daylight saving time will save more energy in India than corresponding DST or time zones," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 657-669.
    3. Verdejo, Humberto & Becker, Cristhian & Echiburu, Diego & Escudero, William & Fucks, Emiliano, 2016. "Impact of daylight saving time on the Chilean residential consumption," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 456-464.
    4. Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2016. "Does Daylight Saving Save Energy? A Meta-Analysis," MPRA Paper 74518, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. repec:eee:jeeman:v:86:y:2017:i:c:p:93-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Wolff, Hendrik & Makino, Momoe, 2012. "Extending Becker's Time Allocation Theory to Model Continuous Time Blocks: Evidence from Daylight Saving Time," IZA Discussion Papers 6787, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Mirza, Faisal Mehmood & Bergland, Olvar, 2011. "The impact of daylight saving time on electricity consumption: Evidence from southern Norway and Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3558-3571, June.
    8. Jennifer L. Doleac & Nicholas J. Sanders, 2012. "Under the Cover of Darkness: Using Daylight Saving Time to Measure How Ambient Light Influences Criminal Behavior," Discussion Papers 12-004, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    9. Sexton, Alison L. & Beatty, Timothy K.M., 2014. "Behavioral responses to Daylight Savings Time," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PA), pages 290-307.
    10. Klein, Daniel R. & Olonscheck, Mady & Walther, Carsten & Kropp, J├╝rgen P., 2013. "Susceptibility of the European electricity sector to climate change," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 183-193.
    11. Herber, Stefanie P. & Quis, Johanna Sophie & Heineck, Guido, 2015. "Does the transition into daylight saving time affect students' performance?," BERG Working Paper Series 100, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    12. Matthew J. Kotchen & Laura E. Grant, 2011. "Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1172-1185, November.
    13. Shaffer, Blake, 2017. "Location matters: daylight saving time and electricity use," MPRA Paper 84053, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Morrison, Geoffrey M. & Lin Lawell, C.-Y. Cynthia, 2016. "Does employment growth increase travel time to work?: An empirical analysis using military troop movements," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 180-197.
    15. Kountouris, Yiannis & Remoundou, Kyriaki, 2014. "About time: Daylight Saving Time transition and individual well-being," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 100-103.
    16. repec:eee:eneeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:247-260 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Hancevic, Pedro & Margulis, Diego, 2016. "Daylight saving time and energy consumption: The case of Argentina," MPRA Paper 80481, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Bergland, Olvar & Mirza, Faisal, 2017. "Latitudinal Effect on Energy Savings from Daylight Savings Time," Working Paper Series 08-2017, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business.
    19. Karasu, Servet, 2010. "The effect of daylight saving time options on electricity consumption of Turkey," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 3773-3782.

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