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Family Financial Management and Individual Deprivation

Author

Listed:
  • Sara Cantillon

    () (GCU)

  • Bertrand Maître

    (ESRI)

  • Dorothy Watson

    (ESRI)

Abstract

Abstract A core assumption in conventional poverty measurement is that household members share equally in total household income. This paper focuses on heterosexual couple households and asks to what extent male and female partners may derive different benefits from total couple resources. Drawing on the 2010 Irish Survey on Income and Living Conditions module, we examined the couple financial regime, by which we mean which partners received income, whether the income was from work, the extent to which income was contributed for the benefit of other household members and responsibility for decision-making. We explored whether the couple’s financial regime was associated with different living standard outcomes for the partners. Among the findings was the beneficial impact of having income from work and of shared responsibility for decision-making. The paper concludes by pointing to some implications for our understanding of power and bargaining in couples.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Cantillon & Bertrand Maître & Dorothy Watson, 2016. "Family Financial Management and Individual Deprivation," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 461-473, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:37:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s10834-015-9466-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-015-9466-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Elena Bárcena-Martín & Maite Blázquez & Ana I. Moro Egido, 2016. "Intrahousehold allocation of resources and household deprivation," ThE Papers 16/05, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    2. repec:zbw:espost:183582 is not listed on IDEAS

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