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Poverty Within Households: Measuring Gender Differences Using Nonmonetary Indicators

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  • Sara Cantillon
  • Brian Nolan

Abstract

Conventional methods of analysis of poverty assume resources are shared so that each individual in a household or family has the same standard of living. Nonmonetary indicators of living standards and deprivation are increasingly being used in measuring household poverty. This paper argues that such indicators can be used for a rather different purpose - the exploration of differences in living standards within households. It illustrates this by using indicators of deprivation of the type used in recent studies of poverty at household level to measure differences between spouses in a large Irish sample. It then discusses the limitations of these indicators for the purpose at hand and points to the need to develop more sensitive indicators of deprivation designed to measure individual living standards and poverty status, which can fit within the framework of traditional poverty research using large samples. While the discussion is specific to Ireland, the methodology developed is relevant outside the Irish context, in developing as well as developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Cantillon & Brian Nolan, 2001. "Poverty Within Households: Measuring Gender Differences Using Nonmonetary Indicators," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 5-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:7:y:2001:i:1:p:5-23
    DOI: 10.1080/135457001316854692
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McCloskey, Donald N, 1983. "The Rhetoric of Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 481-517, June.
    2. Mayer, Susan E, 1993. "Living Conditions among the Poor in Four Rich Countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 6(3), pages 261-286.
    3. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 1996. "Resources, Deprivation, and Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287858.
    4. Sen, Amartya, 1979. " Issues in the Measurement of Poverty," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 81(2), pages 285-307.
    5. Haddad, Lawrence & Kanbur, Ravi, 1990. "How Serious Is the Neglect of Intra-Household Inequality?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(402), pages 866-881, September.
    6. Lundberg, S.J. & Pollak, R.A. & Wales, T.J., 1994. "Do Husbands and Wives Pool Their Resources? Evidence from U.K. Child Benefit," Working Papers 94-6, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    7. Tim Callan & Brian Nolan & Christopher Whelan, 1991. "Resources, Deprivation and the Measurement of Poverty. Published in Journal of Social Policy, 1993, Vol 22 No 2," Papers WP021, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Nolan, Brian, 1992. "Low Pay in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number GRS159.
    9. Paul Johnson & Steven Webb, 1989. "Counting people with low incomes: the impact of recent changes in official statistics," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 10(4), pages 66-82, November.
    10. Callan, Tim & Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Brendan J. & Hannan, Damian F. & Creighton, S., 1989. "Poverty, Income and Welfare in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number GRS146.
    11. Woolley, Frances R & Marshall, Judith, 1994. "Measuring Inequality within the Household," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(4), pages 415-431, December.
    12. Shelley Phipps & Peter Burton, 1995. "Social/institutional variables and behavior within households: An empirical test using the Luxembourg income study," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 151-174.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Keane, Claire & Callan, Tim & Walsh, John, 2015. "Gender Impact of Tax and Benefit Changes: A Microsimulation Approach," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT275.
    2. Olivier Bargain & Olivier Donni & Monnet Gbakou, 2010. "The Measurement of Child Costs: Evidence from Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41(1), pages 1-20.
    3. Elizabeth Stanton, 2007. "Engendering Human Development: A Critique of the UNDP’s Gender-Related Development Index," Working Papers wp131, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Tracey Warren, 2006. "Moving Beyond The Gender Wealth Gap: On Gender, Class, Ethnicity, And Wealth Inequalities In The United Kingdom," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1-2), pages 195-219.
    5. Sara Cantillon & Bertrand Maître & Dorothy Watson, 2016. "Family Financial Management and Individual Deprivation," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 461-473, September.
    6. Lelkes, Orsolya, 2003. "A pénz boldogít? A jövedelem és hasznosság kapcsolatának empirikus elemzése
      [Can money buy happiness? An empirical analysis of the relation between income and utility]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 383-405.
    7. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext226 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Olivier Bargain & Olivier Donni, 2009. "Revisiting the cost of children : theory and evidence from Ireland," Open Access publications 10197/2014, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

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