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Cross-national differences in determinants of multiple deprivation in Europe

  • Francesco Figari

    ()

This paper analyses the relationship between deprivation, income and other individual dimensions over time, in eleven European countries, exploiting the longitudinal nature of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP). First, the determinants of deprivation are analysed by using individual fixed effects models for each country separately. Second, a decomposition of the deprivation gaps between countries highlights the main reasons for the differentials across Europe. The results show that changes in income and deprivation do not strictly coincide and highlight the importance of employment status and income sources. In countries where deprivation is higher income is more effective in reducing the deprivation differential. However, a relevant part of the deprivation gap is attributable to a country specific effect revealing the importance of unobserved factors like cultural attitudes and institutions. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2012

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10888-010-9157-9
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Article provided by Springer in its journal The Journal of Economic Inequality.

Volume (Year): 10 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 397-418

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jecinq:v:10:y:2012:i:3:p:397-418
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://springerlink.metapress.com/link.asp?id=111137

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  1. Walter Bossert & Conchita D'Ambrosio & Vito Peragine, 2007. "Deprivation and Social Exclusion," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 777-803, November.
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  8. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2002. "Modelling low income transitions," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-08, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  9. Francesco Figari, 2012. "Cross-national differences in determinants of multiple deprivation in Europe," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 397-418, September.
  10. Desai, Meghnad & Shah, Anup, 1988. "An Econometric Approach to the Measurement of Poverty," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(3), pages 505-22, September.
  11. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
  12. A. Atkinson, 2003. "Multidimensional Deprivation: Contrasting Social Welfare and Counting Approaches," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 51-65, April.
  13. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 1996. "Resources, Deprivation, and Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287858, December.
  14. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
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