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Pooling of Income and Sharing of Consumption within Households

Author

Listed:
  • Jens Bonke

    (Rockwool Foundation Research Unit, Copenhagen)

  • Martin Browning

    (Department of Economics, University of Oxford)

Abstract

There are extensive literatures within economics and economic psychology on the allocation of household income within the household. These two literatures are largely disjoint but both use a concept of ‘income pooling’. In economics this refers to the independence of household decisions from who receives the income within the household. In economic psychology it refers to the management of household finances. This article uses a new Danish expenditure survey that gives information on both concepts and on the assignment of expenditures to consider the link between the two. More importantly, we investigate whether either type of pooling is related to the sharing of expenditures between the two partners. We find that sharing does depend on who receives the income within non-pooling households, but not on the economic psychological income pooling regime per se.

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Bonke & Martin Browning, 2009. "Pooling of Income and Sharing of Consumption within Households," CAM Working Papers 2009-09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuieca:2009_09
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/cam/wp0910/2009-09.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Browning, Martin & Francois Bourguignon & Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Valerie Lechene, 1994. "Income and Outcomes: A Structural Model of Intrahousehold Allocation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1067-1096, December.
    2. Phipps, Shelley & Woolley, Frances, 2008. "Control over money and the savings decisions of Canadian households," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 592-611, April.
    3. François Bourguignon & Martin Browning & Pierre-André Chiappori & Valérie Lechene, 1993. "Intra Household Allocation of Consumption: A Model and some Evidence from French Data," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 29, pages 137-156.
    4. Jens Bonke & Hans Uldall-Poulsen, 2007. "Why do families actually pool their income? Evidence from Denmark," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 113-128, June.
    5. Manser, Marilyn & Brown, Murray, 1980. "Marriage and Household Decision-Making: A Bargaining Analysis," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 21(1), pages 31-44, February.
    6. Ashby, Katherine J. & Burgoyne, Carole B., 2008. "Separate financial entities?: Beyond categories of money management," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 458-480, April.
    7. Vogler, Carolyn & Brockmann, Michaela & Wiggins, Richard D., 2008. "Managing money in new heterosexual forms of intimate relationships," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 552-576, April.
    8. Chen, Zhiqi & Woolley, Frances, 2001. "A Cournot-Nash Model of Family Decision Making," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(474), pages 722-748, October.
    9. Phipps, Shelley A & Burton, Peter S, 1998. "What's Mine Is Yours? The Influence of Male and Female Incomes on Patterns of Household Expenditure," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(260), pages 599-613, November.
    10. Burgoyne, Carole B. & Reibstein, Janet & Edmunds, Anne & Dolman, Valda, 2007. "Money management systems in early marriage: Factors influencing change and stability," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 214-228, April.
    11. McElroy, Marjorie B & Horney, Mary Jean, 1981. "Nash-Bargained Household Decisions: Toward a Generalization of the Theory of Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(2), pages 333-349, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Susanne Elsas, 2013. "Pooling and Sharing Income within Households: A Satisfaction Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 587, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Kulic, Nevena, 2013. "The type and duration of family unions and income sharing: The implications for women's economic well-being," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 7-15.
    3. Ori Zax, 2015. "Human Capital And The Probability Of Divorce," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(S1), pages 111-134, December.
    4. Sara Cantillon & Bertrand Maître & Dorothy Watson, 2016. "Family Financial Management and Individual Deprivation," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 461-473, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    household production and intra-household allocation; personal income; wealth and their distributions; methodology for collecting; estimating; and organizing microeconomic data; marriage and family;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access

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