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Satu Nivalainen

Personal Details

First Name:Satu
Middle Name:
Last Name:Nivalainen
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RePEc Short-ID:pni36
Niittaajankatu 5 A 6, FIN-00810 Helsinki, Finland

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Where do migrants go? An analysis of urban and rural destined/originated migration in Finland in 1996-99," ERSA conference papers ersa04p317, European Regional Science Association.
  2. Satu Nivalainen, 2003. "Who move to rural areas? Micro Evidence from Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa03p214, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Satu Nivalainen, 2001. "The impact of migration on earnings of married men and women," ERSA conference papers ersa01p249, European Regional Science Association.
  4. Nivalainen, Satu, 2000. "Migration And Post-Move Employment In Two-Earner Families," ERSA conference papers ersa00p47, European Regional Science Association.
  5. Nivalainen, Satu, 1999. "The effects of family life cycle, family ties and distance on migration: micro evidence from Finland in 1994," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa271, European Regional Science Association.

Articles

  1. Satu Nivalainen, 2005. "Interregional migration and post-move employment in two-earner families: Evidence from Finland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(7), pages 891-907.
  2. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Determinants of family migration: short moves vs. long moves," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 157-175, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Where do migrants go? An analysis of urban and rural destined/originated migration in Finland in 1996-99," ERSA conference papers ersa04p317, European Regional Science Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Enflo, Kerstin, 2014. "Finland’s regional GDPs 1880-2010: estimates, sources and interpretations," Lund Papers in Economic History 135, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    2. Tahir Mahmood & Eatzaz Ahmad, 2014. "Output growth and investment dynamics in Finland: a panel data analysis," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(4), pages 777-801, November.

  2. Satu Nivalainen, 2003. "Who move to rural areas? Micro Evidence from Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa03p214, European Regional Science Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Where do migrants go? An analysis of urban and rural destined/originated migration in Finland in 1996-99," ERSA conference papers ersa04p317, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Cécile Détang-Dessendre & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Virginie Piguet, 2004. "Life-cycle position and migration to urban and rural areas: estimations of a mixed logit model on French data," Working Papers 0403, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    3. Franklin Amuakwa-Mensah, 2015. "Climate element of migration decision in Ghana: Micro Evidence," Working Papers 2015.18, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    4. Mann, Stefan & Erdin, Daniel, 2005. "Die Landwirtschaft und andere Einflussgrößen auf die Bevölkerungsentwicklung im ländlichen Raum," German Journal of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department for Agricultural Economics, vol. 54(5).

  3. Nivalainen, Satu, 1999. "The effects of family life cycle, family ties and distance on migration: micro evidence from Finland in 1994," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa271, European Regional Science Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Where do migrants go? An analysis of urban and rural destined/originated migration in Finland in 1996-99," ERSA conference papers ersa04p317, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Satu Nivalainen, 2003. "Who move to rural areas? Micro Evidence from Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa03p214, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Satu Nivalainen, 2001. "The impact of migration on earnings of married men and women," ERSA conference papers ersa01p249, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Nivalainen, Satu, 2000. "Migration And Post-Move Employment In Two-Earner Families," ERSA conference papers ersa00p47, European Regional Science Association.

Articles

  1. Satu Nivalainen, 2005. "Interregional migration and post-move employment in two-earner families: Evidence from Finland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(7), pages 891-907.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Vassilis Tselios, 2010. "Returns to migration, education and externalities in the European Union," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 411-434, June.
    2. Alan Benson, 2014. "Rethinking the Two-Body Problem: The Segregation of Women Into Geographically Dispersed Occupations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1619-1639, October.
    3. Kent Eliasson & Robert Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2014. "All in the family: Self-selection and migration by couples," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 101-124, March.
    4. Lehmer, Florian & Ludsteck, Johannes, 2008. "The returns to job mobility and inter-regional migration," IAB Discussion Paper 200806, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Åström, Johanna & Westerlund, Olle, 2011. "Sex and Migration: Who is the Tied Mover?," HUI Working Papers 33, HUI Research.

  2. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Determinants of family migration: short moves vs. long moves," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 157-175, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Benoit Dostie & Pierre Thomas Léger, 2006. "Self-selection in migration and returns to unobservable skills," Cahiers de recherche 06-01, HEC Montréal, Institut d'économie appliquée.
    2. Mika Haapanen & Hannu Tervo, 2006. "Migration Behaviour and Duration of Residence Spells of Graduating Students in Finland in 1987-2002," ERSA conference papers ersa06p379, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Martin Junge & Martin Munk & Panu Poutvaara, 2015. "International Migration of Couples," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1519, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Kent Eliasson & Robert Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2014. "All in the family: Self-selection and migration by couples," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 101-124, March.
    5. Janice Compton & Robert A. Pollak, 2004. "Why Are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Metropolitan Areas," NBER Working Papers 10918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Timothy Morris, 2017. "Examining the influence of major life events as drivers of residential mobility and neighbourhood transitions," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(35), pages 1015-1038, March.
    7. Zheren WU, 2008. "Self-selection and Earnings of Migrants: Evidence from Rural China," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 08-25, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    8. Cécile Détang-Dessendre & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Virginie Piguet, 2008. "Life Cycle And Migration To Urban And Rural Areas: Estimation Of A Mixed Logit Model On French Data," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 789-824.
    9. Birgitta Rabe, 2011. "Dual-earner migration. Earnings gains, employment and self-selection," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 477-497, April.
    10. Terra Mckinnish, 2008. "Spousal Mobility and Earnings," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(4), pages 829-849, November.
    11. Åström, Johanna & Westerlund, Olle, 2011. "Sex and Migration: Who is the Tied Mover?," HUI Working Papers 33, HUI Research.
    12. Kronenberg, Kristin & Carree, Martin, 2010. "Job and residential mobility in the Netherlands: the influence of human capital, household composition and location," MPRA Paper 25840, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Foged, Mette, 2016. "Family Migration and Relative Earnings Potentials," IZA Discussion Papers 10180, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. William A.V. Clark & Suzanne Davies Withers, 2007. "Family migration and mobility sequences in the United States," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(20), pages 591-622, December.
    15. Hendrik Jürges, 2006. "Gender ideology, division of housework, and the geographic mobility of families," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 299-323, December.
    16. Cécile Détang-Dessendre & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Virginie Piguet, 2004. "Life-cycle position and migration to urban and rural areas: estimations of a mixed logit model on French data," Working Papers 0403, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    17. Benoit Dostie & Pierre Thomas Léger, 2006. "Self-Selection in Migration and Returns to Skills," Cahiers de recherche 0612, CIRPEE.
    18. Petri Böckerman & Mika Haapanen, 2013. "The effect of polytechnic reform on migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 593-617, April.
    19. Satu Nivalainen, 2003. "Who move to rural areas? Micro Evidence from Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa03p214, European Regional Science Association.
    20. Michael Quinn & Stephen Rubb, 2011. "Spouse Overeducation and Family Migration: Evidence from the US," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 36-45, March.
    21. John Moffat & Duncan Roth, 2017. "Cohort size and youth labour-market outcomes in Europe," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(4), pages 2735-2740.
    22. Oostendorp, Rebekka, 2011. "Wohnstandortwahl von Doppelverdienerhaushalten: Möglichkeiten in einer polyzentrischen Stadtregion," Arbeitsberichte der ARL: Aufsätze,in: Schneller, öfter, weiter? Perspektiven der Raumentwicklung in der Mobilitätsgesellschaft. 13. Junges Forum der ARL 13. bis 15. Oktober 2010 in Mannhei, pages 105-116 Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL) - Leibniz-Forum für Raumwissenschaften.
    23. Daniel Liviano & Josep-Maria Arauzo-Carod, 2012. "Spatial Exploration of Age Distribution in Catalan Municipalities," ERSA conference papers ersa12p81, European Regional Science Association.
    24. Mette Deding & Trine Filges, 2010. "Geographical Mobility Of Danish Dual-Earner Couples-The Relationship Between Change Of Job And Change Of Residence," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 615-634.
    25. Govert Bijwaard & Stijn Doeselaar, 2014. "The impact of changes in the marital status on return migration of family migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 961-997, October.
    26. Mika Haapanen & Hannu Tervo, 2012. "Migration Of The Highly Educated: Evidence From Residence Spells Of University Graduates," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 587-605, October.
    27. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Ani Harutyunyan, 2016. " Do migrants think differently? Evidence from East European and post-Soviet states," Working Papers LICOS Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance 551444, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, LICOS Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance.
    28. Ahmet Ali Taskin, 2014. "Sorted and Settled: Migration Decisions of Dual Income Families," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1219, European Regional Science Association.
    29. Steven Tenn, 2010. "The relative importance of the husband’s and wife’s characteristics in family migration, 1960–2000," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(4), pages 1319-1337, September.
    30. Ronald L. Whisler & Brigitte S. Waldorf & Gordon F. Mulligan & David A. Plane, 2008. "Quality of Life and the Migration of the College-Educated: A Life-Course Approach," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(1), pages 58-94.
    31. Sigaud, Thomas, 2014. "Mobilités résidentielles et professionnelles des salariés en France : entreprises, marchés et territoires, une articulation en tension," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/14064 edited by Kirat, Thierry & Cusin, François.
    32. Mark P. Taylor, 2007. "Tied Migration and Subsequent Employment: Evidence from Couples in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(6), pages 795-818, December.
    33. Sergi Vidal & Francisco Perales & Philipp M. Lersch & Maria Brandén, 2017. "Family migration in a cross-national perspective: The importance of institutional and cultural context," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(10), pages 307-338, January.
    34. Salas Garcia, Vania Bitia & Findeis, Jill L., 2011. "The Next Generation: A New Approach to Explain Migration," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103495, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    35. Longhi, Simonetta, 2007. "On-the-job search and job competition: relevance and wage impact in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    36. Steinmayr, Andreas, 2014. "When a random sample is not random: Bounds on the effect of migration on household members left behind," Kiel Working Papers 1975, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    37. Thomas J. Cooke, 2013. "All tied up: Tied staying and tied migration within the United States, 1997 to 2007," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(30), pages 817-836, October.
    38. Anders Boman, 2011. "Does migration pay? Earnings effects of geographic mobility following job displacement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1369-1384, October.
    39. Ye Seul Choi & Up Lim, 2015. "Effects of Regional Creative Milieu on Interregional Migration of the Highly Educated in Korea: Evidence from Hierarchical Cross-Classified Linear Modeling," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(12), pages 1-18, December.
    40. Arauzo Carod, Josep Maria & Liviano Solís, Daniel, 2013. "Migration Determinants at a Local Level," Working Papers 2072/220224, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    41. Jani-Petri Laamanen, 2014. "Worker Turnover, Structural Change, and Inter-Regional Migration: Evidence from Finland," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 34-55, Autumn.
    42. Rabe, Birgitta, 2006. "Dual-earner migration in Britain: earnings gains, employment, and self-selection," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    43. Bijwaard, Govert & van Doeselaar, Stijn, 2012. "The Impact of Divorce on Return-Migration of Family Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 6852, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    44. Hendrik Jürges, 2005. "Gender Ideology, Division of Housework, and the Geographic Mobility Families," MEA discussion paper series 05090, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    45. Zheren WU, 2008. "Relative Income Positions and Labor Migration: A Panel Study Based on a Rural Household Survey in China," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 08-24, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (2) 2004-02-29 2005-11-09

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