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Gemechu Ayana Aga

Personal Details

First Name:Gemechu
Middle Name:Ayana
Last Name:Aga
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pag155
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

International Bank for Reconstruction & Development (IBRD)
World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/backgrd/ibrd/

: (202) 477-1234

1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
RePEc:edi:ibrdwus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Aga,Gemechu A. & Francis,David C., 2015. "As the market churns : estimates of firm exit and job loss using the World Bank's enterprise surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7218, The World Bank.
  2. Aga,Gemechu A. & Francis,David C. & Rodriguez Meza,Jorge Luis, 2015. "SMEs, age, and jobs : a review of the literature, metrics, and evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7493, The World Bank.
  3. Aga, Gemechu Ayana & Soledad Martinez Peria, Maria, 2014. "International remittances and financial inclusion in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6991, The World Bank.
  4. Gemechu Ayana Aga & Christian Eigen-Zucchi & Sonia Plaza & Ani Rudra Silwal, 2013. "Migration and Development Brief, No. 20," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17020, The World Bank.
  5. Dilip Ratha & Gemechu Ayana Aga & Ani Silwal, 2012. "Remittances to Developing Countries Will Surpass $400 Billion in 2012," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17062, The World Bank.

Articles

  1. Gemechu Aga & David Francis, 2017. "As the market churns: productivity and firm exit in developing countries," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 379-403, August.
  2. Gemechu Ayana Aga & Barry Reilly, 2011. "Access to credit and informality among micro and small enterprises in Ethiopia," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 313-329.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Aga,Gemechu A. & Francis,David C., 2015. "As the market churns : estimates of firm exit and job loss using the World Bank's enterprise surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7218, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Aga,Gemechu A. & Francis,David C. & Rodriguez Meza,Jorge Luis, 2015. "SMEs, age, and jobs : a review of the literature, metrics, and evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7493, The World Bank.

  2. Aga,Gemechu A. & Francis,David C. & Rodriguez Meza,Jorge Luis, 2015. "SMEs, age, and jobs : a review of the literature, metrics, and evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7493, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Diwan, Ishac & Jamal Ibrahim Haidar, "undated". "Do Political Connections Reduce Job Creation? Evidence from Lebanon," Working Paper 414186, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    2. Adeleke Oladapo Banwo & Jianguo Du & Uchechi Onokala, 2017. "The determinants of location specific choice: small and medium-sized enterprises in developing countries," Journal of Global Entrepreneurship Research, Springer;UNESCO Chair in Entrepreneurship, vol. 7(1), pages 1-17, December.
    3. Alina Badulescu & Daniel Badulescu & Tomina Saveanu & Roxana Hatos, 2018. "The Relationship between Firm Size and Age, and Its Social Responsibility Actions—Focus on a Developing Country (Romania)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-21, March.
    4. World Bank Group, 2016. "Myanmar Economic Monitor, December 2016," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25972, The World Bank.

  3. Gemechu Ayana Aga & Christian Eigen-Zucchi & Sonia Plaza & Ani Rudra Silwal, 2013. "Migration and Development Brief, No. 20," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17020, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Escaith, Hubert & Tamenu, Bekele, 2013. "Least-developed countries' trade during the super-cycle and the great trade collapse: Patterns and stylized facts," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2013-12, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    2. Rabeh Morrar & Faïz Gallouj, 2013. "The Growth of the Service Sector in Palestine: The productivity challenge," Post-Print halshs-01222937, HAL.
    3. Jean-Louis COMBES & Rasmané OUEDRAOGO, 2014. "Does Pro-cyclical Aid Lead to Pro-cyclical Fiscal Policy? An Empirical Analysis for Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 201424, CERDI.
    4. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Shetty, Sudhir, 2010. "Africa: Leveraging the Crisis into a Development Takeoff," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 30, pages 1-4, September.
    5. Mazhar Y. Mughal & Junaid Ahmed, 2014. "Remittances and Business Cycles: Comparison of South Asian Countries," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 513-541, December.
    6. Valentina VASILE & Liviu VASILE, 2011. "Youths on labour market.Features. Particularities. Pro-mobility factors for graduates. Elements of a balanced policy for labour migration," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 32(1(41)), pages 97-123, June.
    7. Karla Borja, 2014. "Social Capital, Remittances and Growth," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(5), pages 574-596, December.
    8. Ambler, Kate, 2013. "Don’t tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households:," IFPRI discussion papers 1312, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Atamanov, Aziz & Van den Berg, Marrit, 2012. "Determinants of the rural nonfarm economy in Tajikistan," MERIT Working Papers 080, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    10. Goschin, Zizi, 2016. "Main Determinants of Romanian Emigration. A Regional Perspective," MPRA Paper 88829, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Dean Yang, 2011. "Migrant Remittances," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 129-152, Summer.
    12. Clemens, Michael A. & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2012. "Split Decisions: Family Finance when a Policy Discontinuity Allocates Overseas Work," IZA Discussion Papers 7028, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Abida Zouheir & Imen Mohamed Sghaier, 2014. "Remittances, Financial Development and Economic Growth: The Case of North African Countries," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 17(51), pages 137-170, March.
    14. Jounghyeon Kim, 2013. "Remittances and Currency Crisis: The Case of Developing and Emerging Countries," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 88-111, November.
    15. Miguel Ramirez, 2011. "Remittance Flows and Economic Growth in Mexico: A Single Break Unit Root and Cointegration Analysis, 1970-2009," Working Papers 1106, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
    16. Kröger, Antje & Meier, Kristina, 2011. "Employment and the Financial Crisis: Evidence from Tajikistan," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 50, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    17. Ronald Kumar, 2014. "Exploring the nexus between tourism, remittances and growth in Kenya," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1573-1588, May.
    18. Dambar Uprety and Kevin Sylwester, 2017. "The Effect of Remittances upon Skilled Emigration: An Empirical Study," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 1-15, June.
    19. Karla Borja, 2012. "The Impact Of The Us Recession On Immigrant Remittances In Central America," Journal of International Commerce, Economics and Policy (JICEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(03), pages 1-24.
    20. Faruk Balli & Faisal Rana, 2014. "Determinants of risk sharing through remittances: cross-country evidence," CAMA Working Papers 2014-12, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    21. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Jeffrey H. Cohen & Dilip Ratha, 2012. "Migration and Remittances during the Global Financial Crisis and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13092.
    22. Atamanov, Aziz & Berg, Marrit van den, 2011. "International migration and local employment: analysis of self-selection and earnings in Tajikistan," MERIT Working Papers 047, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    23. Jose Antonio Alonso, 2011. "International Migration and Development: A review in light of the crisis," CDP Background Papers 011, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    24. Deolinda Martins & Elena Gaia, 2012. "Preparing for an Uncertain Future: Expanding Social Protection for Children in Eastern Europe and Central Asia," Working briefs 1202, UNICEF, Division of Policy and Strategy.
    25. Laetitia Duval & François-Charles Wolff, 2013. "The consumption-enhancing effect of remittances: Evidence from Kosovo," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 107, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    26. Michael A. Clemens, 2011. "Economics and Emigration: Trillion-Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 83-106, Summer.
    27. World Bank, 2011. "Migration and Remittances Factbook 2011 : Second Edition," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2522.
    28. Docquier, Frédéric & Marfouk, Abdeslam & Özden, Caglar & Parsons, Christopher, 2011. "Geographic, Gender and Skill Structure of International Migration," MPRA Paper 47917, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    29. RANA Rezwanul Hasan & HASHMI Rubayyat, 2015. "The Determinants Of Worker Remittance In Terms Of Foreign Factors: The Case Of Bangladesh," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 10(3), pages 81-93, December.
    30. Shantayanan Devarajan & Sudhir Shetty, 2010. "Africa : Leveraging the Crisis into a Development Takeoff," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10156, The World Bank.
    31. Miguel D. Ramirez, 2017. "Do Remittances Promote Labor Productivity Growth in Mexico? An Empirical Analysis, 1970-2014," Working Papers 1702, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
    32. Ratha, Dilip & Mohapatra, Sanket & Scheja, Elina, 2011. "Impact of migration on economic and social development : a review of evidence and emerging issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5558, The World Bank.
    33. Cooray Arusha, 2014. "Do Low-Skilled Migrants Contribute More to Home Country Income? Evidence from South Asia," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(3), pages 1-28, July.
    34. Rosemary E. Isoto & David S. Kraybill, 2017. "Remittances and household nutrition: evidence from rural Kilimanjaro in Tanzania," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(2), pages 239-253, April.

  4. Dilip Ratha & Gemechu Ayana Aga & Ani Silwal, 2012. "Remittances to Developing Countries Will Surpass $400 Billion in 2012," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17062, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Boulanger Martel, Simon Pierre & Pelling, Lisa & Wadensjö, Eskil, 2018. "Economic Resources, Financial Aid and Remittances," IZA Discussion Papers 11552, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Chandan Sapkota, 2013. "Remittances in Nepal: Boon or Bane?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(10), pages 1316-1331, October.

Articles

  1. Gemechu Aga & David Francis, 2017. "As the market churns: productivity and firm exit in developing countries," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 379-403, August.

    Cited by:

    1. World Bank Group, 2016. "Myanmar Economic Monitor, December 2016," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25972, The World Bank.

  2. Gemechu Ayana Aga & Barry Reilly, 2011. "Access to credit and informality among micro and small enterprises in Ethiopia," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 313-329.

    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Baez-Morales, 2015. "“Determinants of Micro Firm Informality in Mexican States 2008-2012”," AQR Working Papers 201509, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Apr 2015.
    2. Wellalage, Nirosha & Locke, Stuart, 2017. "Access to credit by SMEs in South Asia: do women entrepreneurs face discrimination," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 336-346.
    3. Damaris W. Muhika & Agnes W. Njeru & Esther Waiganjo, 2017. "Influence of Financial Reporting Requirement on Formalizing Small and Medium Enterprises in Kenya," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 7(7), pages 83-100, July.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2014-08-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2015-11-21. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2014-08-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2015-04-02. Author is listed
  5. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2015-11-21. Author is listed
  6. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2014-08-25. Author is listed
  7. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (1) 2015-11-21. Author is listed

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