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Employment and the Financial Crisis: Evidence from Tajikistan

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  • Kröger, Antje
  • Meier, Kristina

Abstract

The financial crisis in 2008/2009 had a presumably substantial influence on the everyday social and economic life of many Tajik people, including their behavior in the labor market. In our paper, we aim to study the impact of the economic crisis on individual labor market decisions. This is the first study investigating the impact of the financial crisis in a transition country using a unique panel data set from Tajikistan. We find that the global financial crisis had a strong impact on employment and migration patterns in Tajikistan. Our results show that regular wage employment and self-employment with hired labor decreased while piece-based wage employment and unpaid family work increased during the crisis. Further, households are more likely to send a family member abroad suggesting that the dependency on sending migrants abroad grows in times of economic turmoil. In combination with increased migration risk our results show that the Tajik labor market has largely been affected by the global financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Kröger, Antje & Meier, Kristina, 2011. "Employment and the Financial Crisis: Evidence from Tajikistan," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 50, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:gdec11:50
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shemyakina, Olga, 2011. "The effect of armed conflict on accumulation of schooling: Results from Tajikistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 186-200, July.
    2. Patricia Justino & Olga Shemyakina, 2012. "Remittances and labor supply in post-conflict Tajikistan," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-28, December.
    3. Ivakhnyuk, Irina, 2009. "Russian Migration Policy and Its Impact on Human Development," MPRA Paper 19196, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Alexander M. Danzer & Oleksiy Ivaschenko, 2010. "Migration patterns in a remittances dependent economy: Evidence from Tajikistan during the global financial crisis," Migration Letters, Migration Letters, vol. 7(2), pages 190-202, October.
    5. Mckenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Network effects and the dynamics of migration and inequality: Theory and evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-24, September.
    6. Gemechu Ayana Aga & Christian Eigen-Zucchi & Sonia Plaza & Ani Rudra Silwal, 2013. "Migration and Development Brief, No. 20," World Bank Publications - Reports 17020, The World Bank Group.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anita Staneva & G Arabsheibani, 2014. "Is there an informal employment wage premium? Evidence from Tajikistan," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
    2. Chernina Eugenia M., 2020. "The Role of Migration Experience in Migrants’ Destination Choice," IZA Journal of Development and Migration, Sciendo & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 11(1), pages 1-29, January.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial crisis; wage employment; migration; Tajikistan;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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