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Remittances and Labor Supply in Post-Conflict Tajikistan

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  • Patricia Justino

    ()

  • Olga Shemyakina

    ()

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of remittances on the labor supply of men and women in post-conflict Tajikistan. We find that on average men and women from remittance-receiving households are less likely to participate in the labor market and supply fewer hours when they do. The negative effect of remittances on labor supply is smaller for women, which is an intriguing result as other studies on remittances and labor supply (primarily focused on Latin America) have shown that female labor supply is more responsive to remittances. The results are robust to using different measures of remittances and inclusion of variables measuring migration of household members. We estimate a joint effect of remittances and an individual’s residence in a conflict-affected area during the Tajik civil war. Remittances had a larger impact on the labor supply of men living in conflict-affected areas compared to men in less conflict-affected areas. The impact of remittances on the labor supply of women does not differ by their residence in both the more or less conflict affected area.

Suggested Citation

  • Patricia Justino & Olga Shemyakina, 2010. "Remittances and Labor Supply in Post-Conflict Tajikistan," Research Working Papers 35, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcn:rwpapr:35
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    File URL: http://www.microconflict.eu/publications/RWP35_PJ_OS.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:fau:fauart:v:67:y:2017:i:2:p:140-164 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Fatma MABROUK & Jacob ODUOR & Abebe SHIMELES, 2015. "Remittances and Youth Labor Market Participation in Africa," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-32, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    3. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir & Kroeger, Antje & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2014. "Household survey data for research on well-being and behavior in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 819-835.
    4. Anghel, Remus Gabriel & Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa, 2015. "Migrants' Remittances: Channelling Globalization," IZA Discussion Papers 9516, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Akramov, Kamiljon T. & Shreedhar, Ganga, 2012. "Economic development, external shocks, and food security in Tajikistan:," IFPRI discussion papers 1163, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Patricia Justino & Ivan Cardona & Rebecca Mitchell & Catherine Müller, 2012. "Quantifying the Impact of Women’s Participation in Post-Conflict Economic Recovery," HiCN Working Papers 131, Households in Conflict Network.
    7. Köllner, Sebastian, 2013. "Remittances and educational attainment: Evidence from Tajikistan," Discussion Paper Series 124, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Chair of Economic Order and Social Policy.
    8. repec:eee:rujoec:v:3:y:2017:i:3:p:296-320 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Kröger, Antje & Meier, Kristina, 2011. "Employment and the Financial Crisis: Evidence from Tajikistan," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 50, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    10. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Jeffrey H. Cohen & Dilip Ratha, 2012. "Migration and Remittances during the Global Financial Crisis and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13092.
    11. Kamalbek Karymshakov & Burulcha Sulaimanova, 2017. "Migration impact on left-behind women’s labour participation and time-use: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan," WIDER Working Paper Series 119, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Patricia Justino & Marinella Leone & Paola Salardi, 2011. "Education and Conflict Recovery: The Case of Timor Leste," HiCN Working Papers 100, Households in Conflict Network.
    13. Atamanov, Aziz, 2015. "Heterogeneous impact of traveling to Western countries on gender norms in Middle East and North Africa countries," MPRA Paper 68122, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Yashodhan Ghorpade, 2012. "Coping Strategies in Natural Disasters and under Conflict: A Review of Household Responses and Notes for Public Policy," HiCN Working Papers 136, Households in Conflict Network.
    15. Kristina Meier, 2014. "Low-Skilled Labor Migration in Tajikistan: Determinants and Effects on Expenditure Patterns," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1433, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    16. Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa & Vadean, Florin, 2013. "Remittances and Occupational Outcomes of the Household Members Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Ivlevs, Artjoms, 2016. "Remittances and Informal Work," IZA Discussion Papers 10196, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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