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Remittances and Youth Labor Market Participation in Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Fatma MABROUK
  • Jacob ODUOR
  • Abebe SHIMELES

Abstract

The paper examines the remittances effects on the labor market participation in Africa with a focus on the young people who belong to the cohort between 15 and 24 years. The study uses seemingly unrelated regression for the period 2000-2011 and data obtained from the World Development Indicators (WDI) and other sources. We find that while remittances have no impacts on the total labor supply, they reduce female labor supply but increase the supply of male workers. On the other hand, remittances reduce the total demand for labor and that of both male and female workers. Finally, Interaction between remittances and religion variables is related to total labor supply in a negative and significant way.

Suggested Citation

  • Fatma MABROUK & Jacob ODUOR & Abebe SHIMELES, 2015. "Remittances and Youth Labor Market Participation in Africa," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-32, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
  • Handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2015-32
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    File URL: http://cahiersdugretha.u-bordeaux4.fr/2015/2015-32.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remittances; Labor market participation; Gender;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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