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Remittance Flows and Economic Growth in Mexico: A Single Break Unit Root and Cointegration Analysis, 1970-2009

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  • Miguel Ramirez

    (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

Abstract

This paper gives an overview of remittance flows to Mexico during the 1980-2009 period in absolute terms, relative to GDP, in comparison to FDI inflows, and in terms of their regional destination. Next, the paper reviews the growing literature that assesses the impact of remittances on investment spending and economic growth. Third, it develops a simple endogenous growth model that explicitly incorporates the potential impact of remittance flows on economic and labor productivity growth. Fourth it presents an empirical counterpart to the conceptual model and, using single-break unit root and cointegration analysis, proceeds to determine the impact of changes in these flows on economic growth and labor productivity growth over the 1970-2009 period. The error-correction model estimates suggest that remittance flows to Mexico, along with other relevant variables, have a positive and significant effect on both economic growth and labor productivity growth. The concluding section summarizes the major results and discusses potential avenues for future research on this important topic.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Ramirez, 2011. "Remittance Flows and Economic Growth in Mexico: A Single Break Unit Root and Cointegration Analysis, 1970-2009," Working Papers 1106, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tri:wpaper:1106
    as

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    File URL: http://www3.trincoll.edu/repec/WorkingPapers2011/wp11-06.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    2. Giuliano, Paola & Ruiz-Arranz, Marta, 2009. "Remittances, financial development, and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 144-152, September.
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    7. Ananth Ramanarayanan, 2009. "Ties that bind: bilateral trade's role in synchronizing business cycles," Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, vol. 4(jan).
    8. Miguel D. Ramirez & Hari Sharma, 2009. "Remittances and Growth in Latin America: A Panel Unit Root and Panel Cointegration Analysis," Estudios Economicos de Desarrollo Internacional, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(1).
    9. M. Ram�rez, 2000. "Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico: A Cointegration Analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 138-162, October.
    10. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
    11. Waheed, Muhammad & Alam, Tasneem & Ghauri, Saghir Pervaiz, 2006. "Structural breaks and unit root: evidence from Pakistani macroeconomic time series," MPRA Paper 1797, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    13. Gemechu Ayana Aga & Christian Eigen-Zucchi & Sonia Plaza & Ani Rudra Silwal, . "Migration and Development Brief, No. 20," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 17020.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Error-correction model; FDI inflows; Johansen Cointegration test; labor productivity growth; remittance flows; Theil inequality coefficient; Zivot-Andrews single-break unit root analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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