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Determinants of Financial Inclusion in Africa: A Dynamic Panel Data Approach

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  • Evans, Olaniyi
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    This study documents the determinants of financial inclusion in Africa for the period 2005 to 2014, using the dynamic panel data approach. The study finds that per capita income, broad money (% of GDP), literacy, internet access and Islamic banking presence and activity are significant factors explaining the level of financial inclusion in Africa. Domestic credit provided by financial sector (% of GDP), deposit interest rates, inflation and population have insignificant impacts on financial inclusion. The findings of this study are of utmost value to African central banks, policymakers and commercial bankers as they advance innovative approaches to enhance the involvement of excluded poor people in formal finance in Africa.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/81326/1/MPRA_paper_81326.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 81326.

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    Date of creation: 2016
    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:81326
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