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Finance and Growth: What We Know and What We Need To Know

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  • Panicos Demetriades
  • Svetlana Andrianova

Abstract

The paper reviews recent literature on the relationship between finance and growth, highlighting areas where we need to know more. The paper argues that institutions, such as financial regulation, have a first-order effect on financial development and growth, and that their effectiveness could determine the success or failure of policies like bank privatisation or financial liberalisation. It concludes that a better understanding of the obstacles to financial development, which include institutional, legal and political economy constraints, is needed.

Suggested Citation

  • Panicos Demetriades & Svetlana Andrianova, "undated". "Finance and Growth: What We Know and What We Need To Know," Discussion Papers in Economics 03/15, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:03/15
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    File URL: https://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/dp03-15.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. De Gregorio, Jose & Guidotti, Pablo E., 1995. "Financial development and economic growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 433-448, March.
    2. Demirguc-Kent, Asli & Detragiache, Enrica, 1998. "Financial liberalization and financial fragility," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1917, The World Bank.
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